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I've been trying to figure out some boundaries of g++, especially linking (C++) object files. I found the following curiosity which I tried to compress as much as possible before asking.

Code

File common.h

#ifndef _COMMON_H
#define _COMMON_H

#include <iostream>

#define TMPL_Y(name,T) \
struct Y { \
  T y; \
  void f() { \
    std::cout << name << "::f " << y << std::endl; \
  } \
  virtual void vf() { \
    std::cout << name << "::vf " << y << std::endl; \
  } \
  Y() { \
    std::cout << name << " ctor" << std::endl; \
  } \
  ~Y() { \
    std::cout << name << " dtor" << std::endl; \
  } \
}

#define TMPL_Z(Z) \
struct Z { \
  Y* y; \
  Z(); \
  void g(); \
}

#define TMPL_Z_impl(name,Z) \
Z::Z() { \
  y = new Y(); \
  y->y = name; \
  std::cout << #Z << "(); sizeof(Y) = " << sizeof(Y) << std::endl; \
} \
void Z::g() { \
  y->f(); \
  y->vf(); \
}

#endif

File a.cpp compiled with g++ -Wall -c a.cpp

#include "common.h"

TMPL_Y('a',char);

TMPL_Z(Za);

TMPL_Z_impl('a',Za);

File b.cpp compiled with g++ -Wall -c b.cpp

#include "common.h"

TMPL_Y('b',unsigned long long);

TMPL_Z(Zb);

TMPL_Z_impl('b',Zb);

File main.cpp compiled and linked with g++ -Wall a.o b.o main.cpp

#include "common.h"

struct Y;
TMPL_Z(Za);
TMPL_Z(Zb);

int main() {
  Za za;
  Zb zb;
  za.g();
  zb.g();
  za.y = zb.y;
  return 0;
}

The result of ./a.out is

a ctor
Za(); sizeof(Y) = 8
a ctor  // <- mayhem
Zb(); sizeof(Y) = 12
a::f a
a::vf a
a::f b  // <- mayhem
a::vf b // <- mayhem

Question

Now, I would have expected g++ to call me some nasty names for trying to link a.o and b.o together. Especially the assignment of za.y = zb.y is evil. Not only that g++ does not complain at all, that I want it to link together incompatible types with the same name (Y) but it completely ignores the secondary definition in b.o (resp. b.cpp).

I mean I'm not doing something sooo far fetched. It is quite reasonable that two compilation units could use the same name for local classes, esp. in a large project.

Is this a bug? Could anybody shed some light on the issue?

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8  
Reading the title, this applies in human relationships, too! :) –  Jonathan M Sep 15 '11 at 20:39
1  
You could have set up something much simpler: Just provide two different declarations with the same name in two TUs and link those. Basically, it's your responsibility to ensure that all declarations are consistent. –  Kerrek SB Sep 15 '11 at 20:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your example, you could put the definition of Y in an anonymous namespace like this:

#define TMPL_Y(name,T) \
namespace { \
    struct Y { \
      T y; \
      void f() { \
        std::cout << name << "::f " << y << std::endl; \
      } \
      virtual void vf() { \
        std::cout << name << "::vf " << y << std::endl; \
      } \
      Y() { \
        std::cout << name << " ctor" << std::endl; \
      } \
      ~Y() { \
        std::cout << name << " dtor" << std::endl; \
      } \
    }; \
}

this essentially creates a unique namespace for each compilation unit and you have, in effect, unique Y's, and the linker will be able to associate correctly.

As for the statement

za.y = zb.y;

this will still yield unpredictable results of course as the 2 types are incompatible.

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Quoting Bjarne Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language":

9.2 Linkage

Names of functions, classes, templates, variables, namespaces, enumerations and enumerators must be used consistently across all translation units unless they are explicitly specified to be local.

It is the programmer's task to ensure that every namespace, class, function, etc. is properly declared in every translation unit in which it appears and that all declarations referring to the same entity are consistent. [...]

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I cannot make a type static. So how can I fulfil my task? I'd imagine that this would be close to impossible to debug -- at leas I would go mad. –  bitmask Sep 15 '11 at 20:51
    
Do not let it get to debugging - instead, just make sure that your code properly uses namespaces to avoid any clashes... –  gha.st Sep 15 '11 at 21:07
    
Namespaces do not help here at all, as the "members" of the namespaces can still clash if you happen to be in the same namespace. –  bitmask Sep 15 '11 at 21:10
1  
but namespaces can help you ensure that the parts where it can clash is small enough for you to keep in control of! –  gha.st Sep 15 '11 at 21:25

In many cases there are errors that the C++ compiler is not required to catch. Many of them are for example errors that are impossible to detect by analyzing one translation unit at a time.

For example without making complex cases with templates if you just declare in an header file

void foo(int x);

and then you provide two distinct definitions for the function in different translation units the C++ compiler is not required to give an error at link time.

Note that this is clearly not impossible to happen by mistake because indeed there could even be two distinct headers with a global function with the same signature and part of the project using one header and part of the project using the other.

The same can happen if you declare a certain class Foo in two different header files with different declarations and with different implementations.

This abuse of naming is simply a kind of error that the compiler is not required to be able to catch.

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