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Absolute beginner question here. I have two lists in mathematica. The first one was generated by the Table command:

Table[QP[[i]], {i, 10}] which generates the list:

{52.5, 45., 37.5, 30., 22.5, 15., 7.5, 0., -7.5, -15.}

the second is a Range

Range[0, 9, 1]

which generates {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}

I need to get these into a list of lists. i.e. {{0,52.5},{1,45} ... } etc. But I can't seem to get it. Do you need to use loops? Because I think that what I want can be generated with the Table and Array commands.

Thanks

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3  
Please remember to use lowercase letters as the first char in user defined symbols. You will save yourself a lot of headaches –  belisarius Sep 15 '11 at 21:01
1  
The answers to this question Pair lists to get tuples in order may also be of interest. –  TomD Sep 16 '11 at 0:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first parameter of Table can be any expression. You can have it output a list of lists, by specifying a list as the first parameter:

Table[{i-1, QP[[i]]}, {i, 10}]
(* {{0, QP[[1]]}, {1, QP[[2]]}, ... {8, QP[[9]]}, {9, QP[[10]]}} *)
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fantastic thank you. –  franklin Sep 15 '11 at 21:00

Transpose may be what you want:

list1 = {52.5, 45., 37.5, 30., 22.5, 15., 7.5, 0., -7.5, -15.}

list2 = Range[0, 9, 1]
Transpose[{list2, list1}]

gives

{{0, 52.5}, {1, 45.}, {2, 37.5}, {3, 30.}, {4, 22.5}, {5, 15.}, {6, 7.5}, {7, 0.}, {8, -7.5}, {9, -15.}}

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2  
Reviewing the answers and comparing with here, I notice that only Flatten has been omitted (which also allow a Transpose of a 'ragged' array). This is easy to forget! See here. Flatten[{list2, list1}, {{2}}] == Transpose[{list2, list1}] –  TomD Sep 16 '11 at 1:03
Thread[List[Range[0, 9], QP[[;; 10]]]]
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3  
Morale: if you don't need a temp symbol to save an intermediate result, don't use it. –  belisarius Sep 15 '11 at 21:20
    
and @rcollyer Why not simply...Thread[List[Range[0,9], QP]? Isn't QP a list? –  David Carraher Sep 16 '11 at 0:44
1  
@David Because from the question I guessed that Length@QP > 10. I may be wrong, of course –  belisarius Sep 16 '11 at 0:55
    
moral* @belisarius –  franklin Sep 25 '11 at 17:01
    
@franklin Thanks! Too late to edit that old comment. –  belisarius Sep 25 '11 at 17:16

To complete the exposition of methods, you could use MapIndexed

MapIndexed[{First[#2] - 1,#1}&, data]

where

data = {52.5, 45., 37.5, 30., 22.5, 15., 7.5, 0., -7.5, -15.}

Or, you could use MapThread

MapThread[List, {Range[0,9], data}]

Although, MapIndexed is more appropriate since it does not require you to generate an extra list.

A last point I want to make is that your code Table[QP[[i]], {i, 10}] implies that QP itself is a list. (The double brackets, [[ ]], gave it away.) If that is correct, than Table isn't the best way to generate a subset, you can use Part ([[ ]]) along with Span directly

QP[[ 1 ;; 10 ]]

or

QP[[ ;; 10 ]]

Then, you can replace data in the first bits of code with either of those forms.

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You stealer! Give me back my offset by one in your MapIndexed! :) –  belisarius Sep 15 '11 at 21:58
1  
@belisarius, fine! Happy now! :) –  rcollyer Sep 15 '11 at 21:59

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