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I need to create a dynamic array to hold strings that I am to read in from three files. I am new to C and I don't really understand how to use pointers or allocate memory. I would like to know if I am declaring my array correctly and if my calloc() calls are correct. The format for the file I am to use is:

word1
word2
word3 (and so on)

I'm just to assume that the words from the files are no longer than 50 characters (including \0).

Eventually I will need to sort them, but I need to get them into an array before I try that. Thanks for any help you may be able to give.


Here is what I have so far...

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int countWords(FILE *f){
int count = 0;
char ch;
while ((ch = fgetc(f)) != EOF){
    if (ch == '\n')
        count++;
}
return count;
}


int main(void){

int i;
int wordCount = 0;
int stringLen = 50;

FILE *inFile;

inFile = fopen("american0.txt", "r");
wordCount += countWords(inFile);
fclose(inFile);

inFile = fopen("american1.txt", "r");
wordCount += countWords(inFile);
fclose(inFile);

inFile = fopen("american2.txt", "r");
wordCount += countWords(inFile);
fclose(inFile);

printf("%d\n", wordCount);


char **wordList = (char **) calloc(wordCount, wordCount * sizeof(char));
for (i = 0; i < wordCount; i++){
    wordList[i] = (char *) calloc(stringLen, stringLen * sizeof(char));
}

char ch;
int currentWord = 0;
int currentWordIndex = 0;
inFile = fopen("american0.txt", "r");
while ((ch = fgetc(inFile)) != EOF){
    if (ch == '\n'){
        currentWord++;
        currentWordIndex = 0;
    }
    else
        wordList[currentWord][currentWordIndex] = ch;
}
inFile = fopen("american1.txt", "r");
while ((ch = fgetc(inFile)) != EOF){
    if (ch == '\n'){
        currentWord++;
        currentWordIndex = 0;
    }
    else
        wordList[currentWord][currentWordIndex] = ch;
}
inFile = fopen("american2.txt", "r");
while ((ch = fgetc(inFile)) != EOF){
    if (ch == '\n'){
        currentWord++;
        currentWordIndex = 0;
    }
    else
        wordList[currentWord][currentWordIndex] = ch;
}

printf("%s\n", wordList[57]);
for (i = 0; i < wordCount; i++){
    free(wordList[i]);}

free(wordList);
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
+1 for a useful and clear question with source code. –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 23:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • You don't need the casts for the return value of calloc. The C language specifies that a value of type void* is compatible with any type of pointer to object. Adding the cast may hide the error of not including the header where calloc is declared. In C++ the rules are different.

  • The function calloc() takes two arguments: the number of elements to allocate and the size of each one

    • In the first calloc you were trying to allocate wordCount elements of a strange size. I like to use the object itself as operand to the sizeof operator
    • In the 2nd calloc you were trying to allocate 50 elements of size 50 each. But you only want 1 element in each wordCount, right? Also sizeof (char) is, by definition, 1 so it doesn't buy you anything to multiply by it.

Try like this

char **wordList = calloc(wordCount, sizeof *wordlist);
for (i = 0; i < wordCount; i++) {
    wordList[i] = calloc(1, stringLen);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that, but the printf("%s\n", wordList[57]); didn't give me a full string (just the letter 's' which is not in any of the files). Is that the wrong way to try to print out, or is the way I added new data to the array wrong? –  Michael Schilling Sep 15 '11 at 22:40
    
The way you add data is wrong: you need to increase currentWordIndex after every character. Also you should fclose the files once you're done with them. –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 22:50
    
Duh! Guess I missed that. It works. Thank you so much for the help! –  Michael Schilling Sep 15 '11 at 22:55
    
@Michael: next assignment if you're so inclined :) the same way you wrote a function to count words, write a function to add the words in a opened file to the existing array (and get rid of code duplication -- triplication in your case -- for that functionality). –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 23:09

Try using linked-list data structure.

Sample: http://www.macs.hw.ac.uk/~rjp/Coursewww/Cwww/linklist.html

this suits better to your need.

share|improve this answer
    
What about "Eventually I will need to sort them"? Sorting a linked list is not for beginners :) –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 21:24
    
Dynamic memory allocation into a dynamiclt growing array isn't beginner either. –  Michael Dorgan Sep 15 '11 at 21:37
    
Right, but his array is of fixed size. Before allocating the array, he calculates the size ... and he frees the memory when done –  pmg Sep 15 '11 at 21:42

In sizeof() you must use the type that you're allocating. A pointer to char is a different type than char itself and may (and under most circumstances does) have a different size. For example:

char **wordList = (char **) calloc(wordCount, sizeof(char*));

Also, you don't need to multiply the size of the pointer by the word count, calloc already does that for you. You could also do it this way:

char **wordList = (char **) malloc(wordCount * sizeof(char*));
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