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As an extension of question MSVC unresolved external symbol linking executables. A contains and a class P with two member functions F and G, and also contains a global P MyP. I'm attempting to call functions MyP.F, from Executable T. I finally got past the linking part, but now it fails at runtime with the exception.

A.cpp

 struct P {
     void F();
     void G();
 } MyP;

 P::F() {
 }
 P::G() {
 }
 int main() {
     MyP.F();
     MyP.G();
 }

T.cpp

struct P {
     void F();
     void G();
} MyP;

int main() {
    MyP.F();
    MyP.G();
}

I can put a breakpoint in T at the line where it calls F in Visual Studio 2008, but when I press the button to step in, or to step over, I get an exception First-chance exception at 0xfe5ca589 in A.exe: 0xC0000005: Access reading location 0xfe5ca589. When I look at the call stack, it shows

fe5ca589()
A.exe!G() + 0x60a6 bytes
[Frames below may be incorrect and/or missing, no symbols loaded for A.exe]

Both projects are part of the same Visual Studio solution, and A is properly set as a dependancy for T, and seems to be linking correctly, but I can't step into it. Does anyone have insights how to make Visual Studio load the symbols for A so I can step into it and find the error? (Or if something is linked funny causing the error?)

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Executables don't have the metadata allowing them to be loaded at an alternate address, and A.EXE can't load into T.EXE at its desired address, because T.EXE's code is already there.

You might be able to work around this by changing the default load address of A.EXE (when building it, it's a linker option), but the correct solution is to use a DLL. (Confirmed, no you can't)

Exports from .EXE files are provided to allow plugin DLLs to call functions in the main application. They aren't meant to allow loading the .EXE like it was a DLL.

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Aw, that's not good. I've been working on this for like a month at work, and all I need from A is the one class. So I guess I have to explain to my bosses that what I wanted is not as easily done as I thought, and we have to add an A_alt project as a static library for T to link against. –  Mooing Duck Sep 15 '11 at 21:49
    
And the windows linker didn't notice that this would be a problem? Bad Microsoft. –  Mooing Duck Sep 15 '11 at 21:50
    
@Mooing: For more information, search this explanation of the PE format for "relocation". It might be possible for you to force the linker to emit relocation data in A.EXE, or change the load address of T.EXE so A.EXE doesn't need to be fixed up, but it definitely won't work by default. –  Ben Voigt Sep 15 '11 at 21:51
    
@Mooing: Please note that the call from T.EXE to A.EXE is always indirect, and can be adjusted to point wherever A.EXE actually loaded. It's the references inside A.EXE to data and other functions inside itself that aren't position independent, and that isn't related to the import library that the linker sees while producing T.EXE. I guess the linker could go out and inspect A.EXE, but you might use a different version at runtime than the one that existed on the computer where link ran. –  Ben Voigt Sep 15 '11 at 21:55
    
@Mooing: Also read this thread on microsoft.public.win32.programmer.kernel –  Ben Voigt Sep 15 '11 at 21:57
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