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I want my python function to split a sentence (input) and store each word in a list. The code that I've written so far splits the sentence, but does not store the words as a list. How do I do that?

def split_line(text):

    # split the text
    words = text.split()

    # for each word in the line:
    for word in words:

        # print the word
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What part of this code does not work? Can you provide the error message or the problem you're having? –  S.Lott Apr 13 '09 at 13:00
As it is, you will be printing the full list of words for each word in the list. I think you meant to use print(word) as your last line. –  tgray Apr 13 '09 at 14:08
Question has been edited to include the correct answer so it does not make sense anymore –  Joop Sep 17 '14 at 9:30
@Joop The correct thing to do in that case is to roll back the edit. From Stack Exchange guidelines: "Edits that modify code or correct code typos in a question, with the exception of indentation changes and other white space modifications (in non-whitespace sensitive languages), should be rejected as clearly conflicts with the author’s intent or causes harm." I just now took care of it by rolling it back, so don't worry about this one. –  Maximillian Laumeister Aug 7 at 1:28

11 Answers 11

up vote 106 down vote accepted


This should be enough to store each word in a list. 'words' is already a list of the words from the sentence, so there is no need for the loop.

Second, it might be a typo, but you have your loop a little messed up. If you really did want to use append, it would be:




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Splits the string in 'text' on delimiter: " ".

words = text.split()      

Split the string in 'text' on delimiter: ","

words = text.split(",")   

The words variable will be a list datatype and contain a list of words from 'text' split on the delimiter.

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string.split() returns a list:

Return a list of the words of the string s. If the optional second argument sep is absent or None, the words are separated by arbitrary strings of whitespace characters (space, tab, newline, return, formfeed).

>>> line="a sentence with a few words"
>>> line.split()
['a', 'sentence', 'with', 'a', 'few', 'words']
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Depending on what you plan to do with your sentence-as-a-list, you may want to look at the Natural Language Took Kit. It deals heavily with text processing and evaluation. You can also use it to solve your problem:

import nltk
words = nltk.word_tokenize(raw_sentence)

This has the added benefit of splitting out punctuation.


>>> import nltk
>>> s = "The fox's foot grazed the sleeping dog, waking it."
>>> words = nltk.word_tokenize(s)
>>> words
['The', 'fox', "'s", 'foot', 'grazed', 'the', 'sleeping', 'dog', ',', 
'waking', 'it', '.']

This allows you to filter out any punctuation you don't want and use only words.

Please note that the other solutions using string.split() are better if you don't plan on doing any complex manipulation of the sentance.

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split() relies on white-space as the separator, so it will fail to separate hyphenated words--and long-dash separated phrases will fail to split too. And if the sentence contains any punctuation without spaces, those will fail to stick. For any real-world text parsing (like for this comment), your nltk suggestion is much better than split()`. –  hobs Dec 14 '11 at 13:10

How about this algorithm? Split text on whitespace, then trim punctuation. This carefully removes punctuation from the edge of words, without harming apostrophes inside words such as we're.

>>> text
"'Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.'"

>>> text.split()
["'Oh,", 'you', "can't", 'help', "that,'", 'said', 'the', 'Cat:', "'we're", 'all', 'mad', 'here.', "I'm", 'mad.', "You're", "mad.'"]

>>> import string
>>> [word.strip(string.punctuation) for word in text.split()]
['Oh', 'you', "can't", 'help', 'that', 'said', 'the', 'Cat', "we're", 'all', 'mad', 'here', "I'm", 'mad', "You're", 'mad']
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I want my python function to split a sentence (input) and store each word in a list

The str().split() method does this, it takes a string, splits it into a list:

>>> the_string = "this is a sentence"
>>> words = the_string.split(" ")
>>> print(words)
['this', 'is', 'a', 'sentence']
>>> type(words)
<type 'list'> # or <class 'list'> in Python 3.0

The problem you're having is because of a typo, you wrote print(words) instead of print(word):

Renaming the word variable to current_word, this is what you had:

def split_line(text):
    words = text.split()
    for current_word in words:

..when you should have done:

def split_line(text):
    words = text.split()
    for current_word in words:

If for some reason you want to manually construct a list in the for loop, you would use the list append() method, perhaps because you want to lower-case all words (for example):

my_list = [] # make empty list
for current_word in words:

Or more a bit neater, using a list-comprehension:

my_list = [current_word.lower() for current_word in words]
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Python's strings have a handy method, split.

>>> "It was love at first sight".split()
['It', 'was', 'love', 'at', 'first', 'sight']
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I found shlex for splitting strings and use it now all the time. Difference to str.split() is the preservation of quotes:

>>> import shlex
>>> shlex.split("sh user -c '/usr/bin/program'")
['sh', 'user', '-c', '/usr/bin/program']
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I think you are confused because of a typo.

Replace print(words) with print(word) inside your loop to have every word printed on a different line

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This statement returns a list of the words of your string 'text' and stores the list in 'words'. You don't see the list because you are printing out the elements of the list one by one.

To see the list, use this statement in place of the for loop

print words

and you will get the desired output!!

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You'll want to strip punctuation to pull words, which means you may want to import string so you can replace punctuation and find actual words. This function returns a list of unique words in a sentence for any given block of text and punctuation:

import string
def countWord(arg):
    arg = arg.lower()
    for x in string.punctuation:
        arg = arg.replace(x," ")
arg = arg.split()
return list(set(arg))
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