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I saw two common approaches for coding standards for private member variables:

class Foo
{
    private int _i;
    private string _id;     
}

and

class Foo
{
    private int m_i;
    private string m_id; 
}

I believe the latter is coming from C++. Also, many people specify type before the member variable (e.g. double m_dVal) to indicate that it is a non-constant member variable of the type double?

What are the conventions in C#?

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closed as not constructive by M4N, Andrew Hare, GEOCHET, BFree, Mehrdad Afshari Apr 13 '09 at 15:19

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Voted to close: "exact duplicate". Please see: stackoverflow.com/questions/634381/…. –  Andrew Hare Apr 13 '09 at 13:04
    
@Andrew Hare NOT exact duplicate as I am asking for a general case and not just m_. thx for pointing out the link though... –  Sasha Apr 13 '09 at 13:16
2  
That "dupe" was closed as S&A. This question is valid (and driis' answer was very helpful, I might add). –  Jon B Apr 13 '09 at 13:30

13 Answers 13

Besides the two you mention, it is very common in C# to not have a prefix for private members.

class Foo
{
    private int i;
    private string id; 
}

That is what I use, and also what is recommended in Microsoft's internal naming guidelines.

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6  
Agreed, with the one exception that personally I will prepend a _ character when the private member is the backing store for a public property. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 13 '09 at 13:01
10  
I prefer the underscore because I like knowing the scope of the variable just by looking at the name –  Jacob Adams Apr 13 '09 at 13:06
1  
I also always use an underscore prefix for property backing fields, as its easy to make a mistake and get a... stackoverflow hur ;) –  meandmycode Apr 13 '09 at 13:08
    
Puntastic meandmycode... :) –  BenAlabaster Apr 13 '09 at 13:09
1  
At least in Java you can let the compiler complain about member accesses without the "this." qualifier. I prefer "this.x" over "_x" (which is still ambigous). –  Marcel Jackwerth Apr 13 '09 at 14:43

As noted by Brad Abrams: internal coding guidelines:

Do not use a prefix for member variables (_, m_, s_, etc.). If you want to distinguish between local and member variables you should use “this.” in C# and “Me.” in VB.NET.

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What a (really, really!) stupid guideline when applied to VB: VB doesn't distinguish the case of identifiers so this guideline simply does not work (it can't distinguish between properties and backing fields)! Incredible. Well, it still can be applied to C#. Fair enough. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 13 '09 at 13:00
14  
@Konrad Radolph: Seems like they have an implicit internal guideline: don't use VB :) –  Mehrdad Afshari Apr 13 '09 at 13:02
    
I imagine that they must. I wish I had a link, but I read a recommendation that case not be used as the only distinguishing factor in C# to maintain interopt compatibility. –  Steve Brouillard Apr 13 '09 at 13:12
    
@Steve Brouillard: Yes. That's for public members, though. You shouldn't have two public members that are different only in case. It's not CLS compliant. –  Mehrdad Afshari Apr 13 '09 at 13:17
    
+1 to @Steve for noting this applies to public members and CLS compliance. Private members have a lot more freedom. C# or VB.net. Nothing else should directly access them. But be sure to be consistent throughout the project. And always code for the next person to take over. –  TamusJRoyce Oct 21 '11 at 3:44

I prefer to use your first example, or auto-properties like this, which avoid having the private fields defined in your class at all:

public String MyString { get; set; }

Use the prop snippet to make these REALLY fast.

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1  
Works except that you cant make auto properties read-only... ah well, maybe I'll look for it in C# 5.0. –  Michael Meadows Apr 13 '09 at 13:25
7  
You can make them "read-only" by making the set private or protected: public String MyString { get; private set; } –  Erich Mirabal Apr 13 '09 at 14:45
1  
+1 I didn't know about that snippet, thanks! –  wsanville Jan 26 '10 at 2:29
2  
Except that then they're not precisely read-only, a class method can still reset it. –  Chadwick Jun 6 '11 at 16:29
2  
A class method could also set a private field ... what's the difference? –  Daniel Schaffer Jun 6 '11 at 19:20

As I recall from reading Framework Design Guidelines, there really is no set convention for private member variables, except that one should not use Hungarian notation and one should not capitalize the first letter of the variable name (use Camel-casing). There are quotes in the book that support both of your examples, as well as not using any prefix at all.

Personally, I prefer the "m_" prefix.

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I think the important principle here is that you're consistent. Use a "_" or "m" prefix if that's what you like to do and it's consistent with the rest of the code you're working with. Whatever you choose, stick with it and be consistent.

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2  
amen. Consistency shall be the only standard that's required. –  gbjbaanb Apr 13 '09 at 14:55

General guidance from Microsoft here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229002.aspx

Automatic properties in C# are great and I uses then when I can but there are cases where they don't work for me such as when doing type or value checking on a set method.

In general: use camel casing and don't prefix your name with anything such as underscore or a type prefix.

public int Age {get; set;}

or

private int age;
public int Age
{
    get { return age; }
    set
    {
        if(value < 0)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Age > 0");
        age = value;
    }
}
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1  
Not a fan of throwing exceptions is property getter/setters. But that's a different can of worms :) –  Jon B Apr 13 '09 at 13:33
    
I agree and not something that I even infrequently do. More for illustration. Agreeed, a different can o-worms. –  andleer Apr 13 '09 at 16:02

While this document is by no means the gospel of naming conventions, it does reference a lot of industry standards and sets some reasonably sensible guidelines to follow. The one thing to remember is that guidelines aren't gospel, there are going to be situations where these "standards" just don't work. It's a great starting point though:

http://www.irritatedvowel.com/Programming/Standards.aspx

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This link no longer works –  Bill Aug 2 at 14:36

I tend to go with the first convention, a simple underscore. I also don't specify the type in the name, because I've got Intellisense telling me what it is (I know, it can be a crutch).

Best to check with your coworkers or project teammates and just decide on a convention, some of them are kind of arbitrary.

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Best is to use whatever is already used in the project. If you start a new project, use whatever is most often used in the company.

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4  
If you start a new company, throw a coin. :) –  ibz Apr 13 '09 at 13:03

I personally have always used your first example of:

    public class Foo
    {
        private int _i;
        private string _id;
    }

In fact, that's what my entire team uses. Additionally the one you mentioned m_dVal is known as Hungarian Notation, here is the Wikipedia Entry. Hungarian Notation is actually against our teams' coding standards, so I never use it.

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I prefer not using any prefix at all for member variables. For those declared outside the method, I use "this.memberVariableName" to distinguish them from those declared inside the method.

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In C++ identifiers beginning with _ are considered bad practice, they should be left for internal use. I think this is why prefixing a variable name with _ is sometimes considered bad practice in C# as well... although there is no reason why you can not do it since all of the .NET internals are encapsulated properly, unlike the C/C++ standard libraries.

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In C++ I like the _ as a suffix for member variables (thus avoiding the internal use issue) –  User Jul 23 at 14:50
    
Yeah, that is forbidden by standards. I use 'm' with no underscores - despite conventional wisdom (its easier to read once you get over your perception bias and one less thing to confuse newbies). –  jheriko Jul 25 at 11:03

I prefer underscore as prefix for private non const non readonly fields. Why? Reasons: 1. Simply looking on variable I can distinguish between field & local/parameter variable. Using "this." for all fields is not an option - its longer. 2. There is ambiguity between parameter and field:

class Foo
{
  private int id;
  public Foo(int id)
  {
    id = id; //Will compile and work fine. But field will not be initialized.
  }
}
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This specific scenario will generate a warning though. –  Matthijs Wessels Aug 8 '12 at 12:48