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I have been all over this issue in programmatically applying compression methods to data... I have searched and come accrose many sites on the subject but none seem to be doing the trick for me.

For my latest finds, I have: Simple object to byte[] & byte[] to object methods(I prefer these) & A rather more complex class extension

They both seem to Compress very well but throw an error during decompression.

MY GOAL: -> Compress and write data in-memory to a file. -> Read from file and decompress data.

The main program that is to use this, has a string containing objects all separated with a < CARD > tag; each object contains six strings and an image(converted to string) all separated with a < DATA > tag.

I wrote a simple 'test' program to experiment before finally applying... this is the code:

    private void btnCompress_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            Encoding enc = new UTF32Encoding();
            richTextBox1.Text = enc.GetString(CompressionStyle2.Compress(richTextBox1.Text));
        }
        catch (Exception ex) { MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString()); }
    }

    private void btnDecompress_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            Encoding enc = new UTF32Encoding();
            richTextBox1.Text = (string)CompressionStyle2.Decompress(enc.GetBytes(richTextBox1.Text));
        }
        catch (Exception ex) { MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString()); }
    }

(I don't care much about efficiency in dummy-programs - though I try not to do a sloppy job either)

What might I be doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're trying to store binary data in a textbox. That's likely to truncate at the first NUL, and possibly corrupt the data in other ways (e.g. backspace characters might not be preserved).

Use Base64 or something like that if you need to treat compressed output as text.

Or just skip the textbox and try using a binary file already.

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I did the first time... it had worked up to the point of my first error today: "Base-64 string contains non-base 64 character(s), more than two padding characters, or a non-white space character among the padding characters." It also doesn't seem to do much compressing either... I tried this recently: (string)CompressionStyle2.Decompress(CompressionStyle2.Compress(temp)) so I know it is a problem with how I'm storing the data... –  TekuConcept Sep 15 '11 at 23:48
    
@Teku: Sounds like you've used the Base64 functions backwards. You need to encode after compressing, and decode before decompressing. –  Ben Voigt Sep 15 '11 at 23:54
    
So, will this work: From file: MemoryStream main = new MemoryStream(); file.CopyTo(main); String temp =(string)Decompress(main.GetBuffer()); To file: BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(file); writer.Write(Compress(data)); –  TekuConcept Sep 16 '11 at 0:03
    
Possibly, although you could use File.ReadAllBytes() and skip the MemoryStream. –  Ben Voigt Sep 16 '11 at 1:00
    
Thank you for sharing that! I was able to make major improvements and saved a lot of lines doing so... –  TekuConcept Sep 16 '11 at 5:11
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enc.GetString() works only if the data you pass to it, is really an encoded string.

But in your case, you are not passing an encoded string to that method. You are passing a byte array containing the output of a compression step. The compression produces "a bunch of bytes". And it is not possible to just generate a string from that set of bytes.

What you're doing wrong is assuming a byte array is a byte array, and you can call Encoding.GetString() on any byte array you like. It doesn't work that way.

As Ben Voigt said you will need to encode the byte array in some form, before displaying it in the text box. If you want to convert a byte array to a displayable string, then encode it either via a hex-encode step, or base64, or something.

Then, you'd have to do the reverse (decode it) when you want to decompress.

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