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I am working on a query in Sql Server 2005 where I need to convert a value in DateTime variable into a varchar variable in 'yyyy-mm-dd' format (without time part).

Please help, thanks.

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17 Answers

up vote 72 down vote accepted

With Microsoft Sql Server:

--
-- Create test case
--
DECLARE @myDateTime DATETIME
SET @myDateTime = '2008-05-03'

--
-- Convert string
--
SELECT LEFT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, @myDateTime, 120), 10)
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Try the following:

CONVERT(varchar(10), [MyDateTimecolumn], 20)

See this page for convert styles:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928.aspx

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Here's some test sql for all the styles. Make nvarchar(max) shorter to trim (e.g. nvarchar(10)) .

DECLARE @now datetime
SET @now = GETDATE()
select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 0) as output, 0 as style 
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 1), 1
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 2), 2
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 3), 3
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 4), 4
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 5), 5
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 6), 6
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 7), 7
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 8), 8
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 9), 9
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 10), 10
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 11), 11
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 12), 12
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 13), 13
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 14), 14
--14 to 19 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 20), 20
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 21), 21
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 22), 22
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 23), 23
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 24), 24
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 25), 25
--26 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 100), 100
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 101), 101
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 102), 102
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 103), 103
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 104), 104
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 105), 105
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 106), 106
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 107), 107
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 108), 108
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 109), 109
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 110), 110
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 111), 111
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 112), 112
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 113), 113
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 114), 114
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 120), 120
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 121), 121
--122 to 125 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 126), 126
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 127), 127
--128, 129 not valid
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 130), 130
union select convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 131), 131
--132 not valid
order BY style

Here's the result

- 04/15/14   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 1)
- 04/15/14  4:25:45 PM   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 22)
- 04/15/2014     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 101)
- 04-15-14   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 10)
- 04-15-2014     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 110)
- 14.04.15   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 2)
- 14/04/15   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 11)
- 140415     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 12)
- 15 Apr 14  <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 6)
- 15 Apr 2014    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 106)
- 15 Apr 2014 16:25:45:273   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 113)
- 15 Apr 2014 16:25:45:273   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 13)
- 15 جمادى الثانية 1435  4:25:45:273PM   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 130)
- 15.04.14   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 4)
- 15.04.2014     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 104)
- 15/04/14   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 3)
- 15/04/2014     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 103)
- 15/06/1435  4:25:45:273PM  <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 131)
- 15-04-14   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 5)
- 15-04-2014     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 105)
- 16:25:45   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 108)
- 16:25:45   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 24)
- 16:25:45   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 8)
- 16:25:45:273   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 114)
- 16:25:45:273   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 14)
- 2014.04.15     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 102)
- 2014/04/15     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 111)
- 20140415   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 112)
- 2014-04-15     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 23)
- 2014-04-15 16:25:45    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 120)
- 2014-04-15 16:25:45    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 20)
- 2014-04-15 16:25:45.273    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 121)
- 2014-04-15 16:25:45.273    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 21)
- 2014-04-15 16:25:45.273    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 25)
- 2014-04-15T16:25:45.273    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 126)
- 2014-04-15T16:25:45.273    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 127)
- Apr 15 2014  4:25:45:273PM     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 109)
- Apr 15 2014  4:25:45:273PM     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 9)
- Apr 15 2014  4:25PM    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 0)
- Apr 15 2014  4:25PM    <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 100)
- Apr 15, 14     <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 7)
- Apr 15, 2014   <-convert(nvarchar(MAX), @now, 107)
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be aware that YYYY-MM-DD is ambiguous, depending on your language settings. best to use ISO standard YYYYMMDD, see this blog post

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Either Cast or Convert:

Syntax for CAST:

CAST ( expression AS data_type [ (length ) ])

Syntax for CONVERT:

CONVERT ( data_type [ ( length ) ] , expression [ , style ] )

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928.aspx

Actually since you asked for a specific format:

REPLACE(CONVERT(varchar(10), Date, 102), '.', '-')
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You can use DATEPART(DATEPART, VARIABLE). For example:

DECLARE @DAY INT 
DECLARE @MONTH INT
DECLARE @YEAR INT
DECLARE @DATE DATETIME
@DATE = GETDATE()
SELECT @DAY = DATEPART(DAY,@DATE)
SELECT @MONTH = DATEPART(MONTH,@DATE)
SELECT @YEAR = DATEPART(YEAR,@DATE)
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-- This gives you the time as 0 in format 'yyyy-mm-dd 00:00:00.000'


SELECT CAST( CONVERT(VARCHAR, GETDATE(), 101) AS DATETIME) ; 
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SQL Server 2012 has a new function , FORMAT: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee634924.aspx

and you can use custom date time format strings: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee634398.aspx

These pages imply it is also available on SQL2008R2, but I don't have one handy to test if that's the case.

Example usage (Australian datetime):

FORMAT(VALUE,'dd/MM/yyyy h:mm:ss tt')
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With Microsoft SQL Server:

Use Syntax for CONVERT:

CONVERT ( data_type [ ( length ) ] , expression [ , style ] )

Example:

SELECT CONVERT(varchar,d.dateValue,1-9)

For the style you can find more info here: MSDN - Cast and Convert (Transact-SQL).

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declare @dt datetime

set @dt = getdate()

select convert(char(10),@dt,120) --fixed data length of char(10) as you want a specific string format.

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Try:

select replace(convert(varchar, getdate(), 111),'/','-');

More on ms sql tips

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CONVERT, see MSDN documentation.

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This is how I do it: CONVERT(NVARCHAR(10), DATE1, 103) )

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Try the following:

CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),GetDate(),102)

Then you would need to replace the "." with "-".

Here is a site that helps http://www.mssqltips.com/tip.asp?tip=1145

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You did not say which database, but with mysql here is an easy way to get a date from a timestamp (and the varchar type conversion should happen automatically):

mysql> select date(now());
+-------------+
| date(now()) |
+-------------+
| 2008-09-16  | 
+-------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
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Check again: he specified sql server via a tag. –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 16 '08 at 16:51
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You don't say what language but I am assuming C#/.NET because it has a native DateTime data type. In that case just convert it using the ToString method and use a format specifier such as:

DateTime d = DateTime.Today; string result = d.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd");

Howerver, I would caution against using this in a database query or concatenated into a SQL statement. Databases require a specific formatting string to be used. You are better off zeroing out the time part and using the DateTime as a SQL parameter if that is what you are trying to accomplish.

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The OP mentioned datetime format. For me, the time part gets in the way.
I think it's a bit cleaner to remove the time portion (by casting datetime to date) before formatting.

convert( varchar(10), convert( date, @yourDate ) , 111 )
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