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Does anyone know why that, of these 3 querys that I have, the fastest one is the one that uses where not exists?.

This article Rewrite SQL Subqueries as Outer Joins says that you can change a where not exists to a normal join. Did I misunderstand? Can someone explain the difference?

This one does it in .73 seconds fetches all 3293 rows

SELECT *
FROM
(SELECT TRIM(TO_CHAR(C21.PINO,'999999999999999')) DN,
C21.INVD,
TRIM(TO_CHAR(C21.ORNO,'999999999999999')),
C21.CFRW,
C21.LIFEX,
C22.PONO,
C22.ITEM,
C22.OQUA,
C71.REFA,
C71.CDEC,
C81.COPO,
DECODE(SUBSTR(TRIM(C22.ITEM),1,3), 'PRD', 1, 'ASY', 2, 'SLA', 3),
C84.NAMA,
C84.CCTY
FROM CMS.CMPPS021@RO_CMS_PRD C21,
CMS.CMPPS022@RO_CMS_PRD C22,
CMS.CMPPS071@RO_CMS_PRD C71,
CMS.CMPPS081@RO_CMS_PRD C81,
CMS.CMPPS084@RO_CMS_PRD C84
WHERE C21.PINO = C22.PINO
AND DECODE( SUBSTR(TRIM(C22.ITEM),1,3) , 'PRD', 'Y', 'ASY', 'Y', 'SLA', 'Y', 'N' ) = 'Y'
AND C21.ORNO = C71.ORNO
AND C21.ORNO = C81.ORNO
AND C22.PONO = C81.PONO
AND C21.ORNO = C84.ORNO
AND C84.CTYP = 'ST'
AND C21.NCMP = 'F555'
AND C21.INVD >= TO_DATE('01012011','MMDDYYYY')
ORDER BY C21.PINO,
C22.PONO
) T1
WHERE NOT EXISTS
( SELECT 1 FROM SHIPPINGCONTROL S WHERE T1.DN=S.S_DN
) ; 

This one does it in 2 seconds

SELECT TRIM(TO_CHAR(C21.PINO,'999999999999999')) DN,
C21.INVD,
TRIM(TO_CHAR(C21.ORNO,'999999999999999')),
C21.CFRW,
C21.LIFEX,
C22.PONO,
C22.ITEM,
C22.OQUA,
C71.REFA,
C71.CDEC,
C81.COPO,
DECODE(SUBSTR(TRIM(C22.ITEM),1,3),'PRD',1,'ASY',2,'SLA',3),
C84.NAMA,
C84.CCTY
FROM CMS.CMPPS021@RO_CMS_PRD C21,
CMS.CMPPS022@RO_CMS_PRD C22,
CMS.CMPPS071@RO_CMS_PRD C71,
CMS.CMPPS081@RO_CMS_PRD C81,
CMS.CMPPS084@RO_CMS_PRD C84,
(SELECT C21.PINO DN
FROM CMS.CMPPS021@RO_CMS_PRD C21
WHERE C21.INVD>=TO_DATE('01012011','MMDDYYYY')
AND C21.NCMP     ='F555'
MINUS
SELECT TO_NUMBER(G_DN) FROM GENERALINFO
) DNSTOFIND
WHERE C21.PINO =C22.PINO
AND DECODE(SUBSTR(TRIM(C22.ITEM),1,3),'PRD','Y','ASY','Y','SLA','Y','N')='Y'
AND C21.ORNO =C71.ORNO
AND C21.ORNO =C81.ORNO
AND C22.PONO =C81.PONO
AND C21.ORNO =C84.ORNO
AND C84.CTYP ='ST'
AND DNSTOFIND.DN =C21.PINO
ORDER BY C21.PINO,
C22.PONO;

This one does it in 4 seconds

SELECT TRIM(TO_CHAR(C21.PINO,'999999999999999')) DN,
C21.INVD,
TRIM(TO_CHAR(C21.ORNO,'999999999999999')),
C21.CFRW,
C21.LIFEX,
C22.PONO,
C22.ITEM,
C22.OQUA,
C71.REFA,
C71.CDEC,
C81.COPO,
DECODE(SUBSTR(TRIM(C22.ITEM),1,3),'PRD',1,'ASY',2,'SLA',3),
C84.NAMA,
C84.CCTY
FROM CMS.CMPPS021@RO_CMS_PRD C21,
CMS.CMPPS022@RO_CMS_PRD C22,
CMS.CMPPS071@RO_CMS_PRD C71,
CMS.CMPPS081@RO_CMS_PRD C81,
CMS.CMPPS084@RO_CMS_PRD C84,
(SELECT C21.PINO DN
FROM CMS.CMPPS021@RO_CMS_PRD C21,
    GENERALINFO G
WHERE C21.INVD>=TO_DATE('01012011','MMDDYYYY')
AND C21.NCMP     ='F555'
AND C21.PINO     =G.G_DN(+)
AND G.G_DN        IS NULL
) DNSTOFIND
WHERE C21.PINO =C22.PINO
AND DECODE(SUBSTR(TRIM(C22.ITEM),1,3),'PRD','Y','ASY','Y','SLA','Y','N')='Y'
AND C21.ORNO =C71.ORNO
AND C21.ORNO =C81.ORNO
AND C22.PONO =C81.PONO
AND C21.ORNO =C84.ORNO
AND C84.CTYP ='ST'
AND DNSTOFIND.DN =C21.PINO
ORDER BY C21.PINO,
C22.PONO;
share|improve this question
2  
Welcome to StackOverflow. I hope your real SQL isn't as badly spaced and formatted as what you posted. I made some edits to get you started, but gave up after about 10 minutes of trying to fix it. Please edit your post to provide proper spacing between conditions such as C1 = C2, C3, C4 (note the spaces where they belong) so that lines properly break, and then break them so they're of readable length. You can preview your post during fixing it by scrolling down in the page; the preview is below the code editing window. As is, your post is unreadable and will probably not get answers. :) –  Ken White Sep 15 '11 at 23:50
    
Also, SHOUTING in your question's title won't help you get answers any faster. :) It just makes it harder to read. –  Ken White Sep 15 '11 at 23:52
    
Sorry about that is this better? Also what you mean about shouting? it just says Oracle Query Tuning or it should be some other way? –  Mario Sep 20 '11 at 17:52
    
Yes, much easier (although still not what I'd want any of my team to use as formatting) :). SHOUTING (in online conversations) is typing in ALL CAPS. It's the way you asked your question before I edited it the first time. SHOUTING makes text harder to read, and is simply annoying to most people. I changed your title from ORACLE QUERY TUNING to the proper case to make it more readable. –  Ken White Sep 20 '11 at 20:30
    
Lol I used automatic formatting from SQL Developer and I haven't personalize it. Oh i didn't noticed I was writing the code in UPPERCAPS and i didn't remember to remove Cap Lock –  Mario Sep 20 '11 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

"Does anyone know why that, of these 3 querys that I have, the fastest one is the one that uses where not exists?"

It's the only one which references the SHIPPINGCONTROL table, so it's a different query. One would expect different queries to have different execution plans and hence different retrieval times.

share|improve this answer
    
yes that's true, but I forgot to mention that Shipping control basically has the same records and indixes as GENERALINFO –  Mario Oct 4 '11 at 20:34
    
@Mario - sorry but what exactly are you expecting us to tell you? You post three complicated queries without any explanation of the underlying business logic, or any useful contextual information such as data volumes, distribution and skew, indexes, etc. No explain plans, nothing. So how are we supposed to be able to explain differences in performance. –  APC Oct 7 '11 at 20:38
    
Ye that is true, I will try to put better information next time, for now I will use the fastest query –  Mario Oct 10 '11 at 18:05

I notice that you were doing a lot of function based calculations on the where clause, column indexes are surpressed where functions are used, unless the function is index based,

share|improve this answer
    
Yes but, they are the same used on 3 of the querys that's why I don't get the error of it –  Mario Sep 20 '11 at 17:53

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