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I want to remove last character from a string. I've tried doing this:

public String method(String str) {
  if (str.charAt(str.length()-1)=='x')
  {
    str = str.replace(str.substring(str.length()-1), "");
    return str;
  }
  else
  {
    return str;
  }
}

Getting the length of the string - 1 and replacing the last letter with nothing (deleting it), but every time I run the program, it deletes middle letters that are the same as the last letter.

For example, the word is "admirer"; after I run the method, I get "admie." I want it to return the word admire.

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Sep 15 '11 at 23:31

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 101 down vote accepted

Replace will replace all instances of a letter. All you need to do is use substring():

public String method(String str) {

  if (str.length() > 0 && str.charAt(str.length()-1)=='x') {
    str = str.substring(0, str.length()-1);
  }
  return str;
}
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3  
I'd add null != str && at the beginning of the check. –  VenomFangs Sep 28 '13 at 16:31
    
you mean str != null &&! –  SSpoke Feb 9 at 5:50
1  
@SSpoke it's the same thing, yours is just a little nicer to read :) –  Marko Jun 26 at 8:41
    
@Marko lol yes since it's the standard, feels odd when people make their own stuff up. –  SSpoke Jun 26 at 19:15
    
@SSpoke @Marko I agree that yours is nicer to read SSpoke. The reason some people write it like VenomFangs did is that in some languages (I'm looking at you C) will allow you to write str = null in an if statement but not null = str so putting the null first stops you from making that mistake. –  Gary Buyn Jun 29 at 21:34
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Why not just one liner?

private static String removeLastChar(String str) {
        return str.substring(0,str.length()-1);
    }

Full Code

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.*;

public class Main
{
    public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
    {
                String s1 = "Remove Last CharacterY";
        String s2 = "Remove Last Character2";
        System.out.println("After removing s1==" + removeLastChar(s1) + "==");
        System.out.println("After removing s2==" + removeLastChar(s2) + "==");
        }

    private static String removeLastChar(String str) {
        return str.substring(0,str.length()-1);
    }
}

Demo

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2  
The check for null and empty string should be considered.. @BobBobBob version is better –  KDjava Dec 22 '12 at 10:23
    
@KDjava : above is valid with considering that valid string is passed. else I would have to add the try catch block also to check that string is correct... –  Fahim Parkar Dec 22 '12 at 11:03
    
i added check for null string before return str.substring(0,str.length()-1); as improvement –  shareef Jul 7 '13 at 6:24
1  
+1 for Ideon.com –  elsadek May 4 at 13:38
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public String removeLastChar(String s) {
    if (s == null || s.length() == 0) {
        return s;
    }
    return s.substring(0, s.length()-1);
}
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What if the last character is a high/low surrogate pair? –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy May 20 '13 at 14:49
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The described problem and proposed solutions sometimes relate to removing separators. If this is your case, then have a look at Apache Commons StringUtils, it has a method called removeEnd which is very elegant.

Example:

StringUtils.removeEnd("string 1|string 2|string 3|", "|");

Would result in: "string 1|string 2|string 3"

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Since we're on a subject, one can use regular expressions too

"aaabcd".replaceFirst(".$",""); //=> aaabc  
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Use this:

 if(string.endsWith("x")) {

    string= string.substring(0, string.length() - 1);
 }
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if (str.endsWith("x")) {
  return str.substring(0, str.length() - 1);
}
return str;

For example, the word is "admirer"; after I run the method, I get "admie." I want it to return the word admire.

In case you're trying to stem English words

Stemming is the process for reducing inflected (or sometimes derived) words to their stem, base or root form—generally a written word form.

...

A stemmer for English, for example, should identify the string "cats" (and possibly "catlike", "catty" etc.) as based on the root "cat", and "stemmer", "stemming", "stemmed" as based on "stem". A stemming algorithm reduces the words "fishing", "fished", "fish", and "fisher" to the root word, "fish".

Difference between Lucene stemmers: EnglishStemmer, PorterStemmer, LovinsStemmer outlines some Java options.

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Don't try to reinvent the wheel, while others have already written libraries to perform string manipulation: org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.chop()

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public String removeLastChar(String s) {
    if (!Util.isEmpty(s)) {
        s = s.substring(0, s.length()-1);
    }
    return s;
}
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removes last occurence of the 'xxx':

    System.out.println("aaa xxx aaa xxx ".replaceAll("xxx([^xxx]*)$", "$1"));

removes last occurrence of the 'xxx' if it is last:

    System.out.println("aaa xxx aaa  ".replaceAll("xxx\\s*$", ""));

you can replace the 'xxx' on what you want but watch out on special chars

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