Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm not quite understanding lambda functions. Here is an example function from the book Land of Lisp:

(defun edges->dot (edges)
  (mapc (lambda (node)
          (mapc (lambda (edge)
                  (fresh-line)
                  (princ (dot-name (car node)))
                  (princ "->")
                  (princ (dot-name (car edge)))
                  (princ "[label=\"")
                  (princ (dot-label (cdr edge)))
                  (princ "\"];"))
                (cdr node)))
        edges))

Let's just look at the inner part here for now:

(mapc (lambda (edge)
        (fresh-line)
        (princ (dot-name (car node)))
        (princ "->")
        (princ (dot-name (car edge)))
        (princ "[label=\"")
        (princ (dot-label (cdr edge)))
        (princ "\"];"))
      (cdr node)))

I understand that the function mapc takes two arguments, a function and a list. I also understand that by using lambda (node) I am passing an anonymous function that takes one argument (node) as the first argument to mapc, and that (cdr node) will be used as the second argument to mapc. At least I think that's what's going on!

What I don't understand is where my anonymous function gets the value for edge in (lambda (edge). I would appreciate it if someone could please explain this to me.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The edge argument comes from the items in (cdr node). Your inner lambda will be called once for each element in (cdr node).

Try this for example:

(mapc #'princ '(1 2 3 4 5))

Or, with a literal lambda:

(mapc #'(lambda (x)
          (princ x)
          (terpri))
      '(1 2 3 4 5))
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, so would it be correct to say that the first argument of mapc must be a function of only one argument? –  MikeJerome Sep 16 '11 at 0:18
    
@MikeJerome: Correct, if you're passing in one list. In general, your function takes as many arguments as lists you're passing in. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 16 '11 at 2:04
    
Cool, I understand now. Thanks for the help. –  MikeJerome Sep 16 '11 at 3:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.