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I know that gzipping files before sending them across the network saves bandwidth, and for static files that can be cached, it is not a significant impact on server-side CPU usage.

But what about the client? They have to gunzip whatever files are sent, which will take CPU time. Additionally, I'm worried that the entire file must be received and gunzipped before any parsing can take place.

This strikes me as odd because I see two scenarios:

1) client has fast internet   -->   gzip is relevant
2) client has slow internet   -->   gzip prevents partial parsing

Clearly the exact speed-up (or slow-down?) will depend on exact circumstances of the files being transferred and the client. However, I'm curious what the time cost (or how can I measure the cost) on the client-side?

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I don't see a clear question here, it seems like you already know the answer is 'it depends'. From my experience gzip's effect on payload size can sometimes overrule all other arguments - like reducing >1mb of dynamic JSON to around 200kb – tomfumb Sep 16 '11 at 1:24
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Specifically I want to know how I can gauge how much time is lost because of gzipping. I know that smaller files will download strictly faster, but I want to measure time inclusive of the time it takes to process on the client's computer (or at least ballpark) – Robert Martin Sep 16 '11 at 1:30
up vote 16 down vote accepted

They have to gunzip whatever files are sent, which will take CPU time.

Perhaps, but the CPU time spent on decompression is extremely small compared to all the other things going on when loading a page (parsing, styling, rendering, scripting).

I'm worried that the entire file must be received and gunzipped before any parsing can take place.

Don't worry, gzip is a "stream" of data and the complete file is not required to begin decompression/parsing.

Specifically I want to know how I can gauge how much time is lost because of gzipping.

Here is an interesting article where the author performs the type of test you're describing. The tools are available for download so that you can perform the same tests in your own environment.

The author concludes:

I guess there are very few cases where you shouldn’t use gzip your content. If your typical page is less than 100 bytes then gzipping it could hurt the client’s and the server’s performance. But no website —except maybe a few web-services— serves pages with a typical size of 100 bytes or less. So there’s no excuse for serving uncompressed HTML.

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really cool -- that article is exactly what I was wondering. – Robert Martin Sep 19 '11 at 21:36

In the mean time (question is a bit old already) most people are using TLS for every connection anyway, so questions about performance have become a bit superfluous. But it's still worthwhile to look at this:

1) client has fast internet --> gzip is relevant
2) client has slow internet --> gzip prevents partial parsing

The opposite is the case. The slower the client's internet connection (or route to the server) the more advantage you get out of gzip compression (or compression in general).

Compression is helpful if the time it takes to compress/decompress plus the time it takes to transmit the compressed data is less than the time it takes to transmit the uncompressed data right away.

Gzip will typically reduce your data to somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 of its original size (depending on what it is), and compression runs at about 50MB/s (+/- 5). Decompression is about 3 times as fast.

100MBit ethernet has a throughput of about 12.5MB/s, and most people do not yet have 100MBit internet access (which, since it normally stacks on top of ATM, is slower than normal ethernet, too). Also, most people most of the time are not able to completely saturate their high bandwidth internet connection with a single download.

So, realistically, for a normal average user and a server that is not in your local area network at home, but "somewhere else", let's say you get 5MB/s (which is about twice the theoretical maxmimum that I have here, btw).

To transmit a 50kB file, you thus need 0.01 seconds. gzip compression adds about 0.001 seconds to compress, and 0.0003 seconds to decompress (let's round up and say 0.002 total), but you only have to transmit 16kB, which takes 0.0032 seconds.

Add them together, transfer with gzip compression is about twice as fast.

Now of course, eventually (when the average user will have like 200Mbit/s internet, and servers have 100Gbit/s uplinks) this figure will turn around.

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Not sure why you were downvoted, have an upvote – Robert Martin Sep 10 '15 at 2:46

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