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I have a website where they want a news ticker. Currently, I have a array that populates it, and every x seconds, I want the news story to change.

function startNews(stories) {

}

I am aware that you can use setInterval, but it has to go through a new function and you can't specify certain javascript in the same function to fire when it does.

What are you suggestions?

Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should use either setInterval() or repeated calls to setTimeout(). That's how you do something in javascript at some time in the future.

There are no limitations on what you can do with either of those timer functions. What exactly do you think you cannot do that is making you try to avoid them?

Here's a pseudo code example:

var newsArray = [];   // your code puts strings into this array
var curNewsIndex = -1;

var intervalID = setInterval(function() {
    ++curNewsIndex;
    if (curNewsIndex >= newsArray.length) {
        curNewsIndex = 0;
    }
    setTickerNews(newsArray[curNewsIndex]);   // set new news item into the ticker
}, 5000);

or it could be done like this:

var newsArray = [];   // your code puts strings into this array
var curNewsIndex = -1;

function advanceNewsItem() {
    ++curNewsIndex;
    if (curNewsIndex >= newsArray.length) {
        curNewsIndex = 0;
    }
    setTickerNews(newsArray[curNewsIndex]);   // set new news item into the ticker
}

var intervalID = setInterval(advanceNewsItem, 5000);
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I had a if statement in x (setInterval("x", 1000);), and firebug gave me an error. –  iosfreak Sep 16 '11 at 2:28
    
@phpnerd211: You are calling it wrong. Drop the quotes. –  alex Sep 16 '11 at 2:31
    
setInterval() takes a javascript function or string as it's first argument. It can be either a function name or an anonymous function declaration. It can also be code in a string, but that is not the best way to do it. See my example above that I added to my answer that uses an inline anonymous function. –  jfriend00 Sep 16 '11 at 2:33
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You should whenever possible use setTimeout. If your function takes longer to run than the interval, you can run into a constant 100% cpu usage situation.

Try this code: http://jsfiddle.net/wdARC/

var stories = ['Story1','Story2','Story3'], 
    i = -1;
(function f(){
    i = (i + 1) % stories.length;
    document.write(stories[ i ] + '<br/>');
    setTimeout(f, 5000);
 })();

Replace document.write with your function.

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