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I tried the Serial.cpp code from Arduino's website.

I just made a couple of changes and got the code working properly. However, the issue is, the C++ code serially sends in ASCII values and not integers. For example, if I send in "5" I receive 53 at the receiver side.

I tried changing the buffer type to an int instead of a char, but it returned an error saying:

error C2664: 'ReadFile' : cannot convert parameter 2 from 'int' to 'LPVOID'

Is there a way to send integers instead of ASCII values serially?

Below is a snippet of the code.

bool Serial::WriteData(char *buffer, unsigned int nbChar)
{
    DWORD bytesSend;

    //Try to write the buffer on the Serial port
    if (!WriteFile(this->hSerial, (void *)buffer, nbChar, &bytesSend, 0))
    {
        //In case it don't work get comm error and return false
        ClearCommError(this->hSerial, &this->errors, &this->status);

        return false;
    }
    else
        return true;
}


int main() {
    // Convert from char* to wchar*

    char *name_ser="COM7";
    cout << name_ser << "(char*)" << endl;
    size_t origsize=strlen(name_ser)+1;
    const size_t newsize=100;
    size_t convertedChars=0;
    wchar_t wcstring[newsize];
    mbstowcs_s(&convertedChars, wcstring, origsize, name_ser, _TRUNCATE);
    wcscat_s(wcstring, L"(wchar_t*)");
    wcout<<wcstring<<endl;

    Serial serial(wcstring);

    if (serial.IsConnected()){
        while (1){
            char *chr0 = "5";
            serial.WriteData(chr0,1);
            cout<<chr0<<endl;
        }
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I believe you do know that 53 is the decimal representation of 5 in ASCII table. If you are using serial, you are sending bytes, those bytes value is 53 (again, in ASCII is the same as 5), I believe you have to convert that integer back to char by using ASCII table. –  Paulo Sep 16 '11 at 16:20
    
my goal was to avoid all the conversion in the first place. I wanted them to be treated as decimal values and not ascii values.I wanted to avoid the conversion at the receiver end. Another way would be to send in hex values and receive data as bits , but i wanted to maintain the code as simple and fast as possible. –  NineHourz Sep 16 '11 at 19:35
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You'll probably need to change the method signature. Try something like this:

bool Serial::WriteData(int * buffer, unsigned int length)
{
    DWORD bytesSend;
    if(!WriteFile(this->hSerial, (void *)buffer, length*sizeof(int), &bytesSend, 0))
    {
        ClearCommError(this->hSerial, &this->errors, &this->status);
        return false;
    }
    else
        return true;
}

You'll need to reconstitute the integers on the Arduino: ints are typically 4 bytes, and I expect the Arduino receive routines are expecting ASCII by default.

share|improve this answer
    
@ Femi It gives me this error... error C2511: 'bool Serial::WriteData(int *,unsigned int)' : overloaded member function not found in 'Serial' –  NineHourz Sep 16 '11 at 4:24
    
You'll need to also modify the header file to include a method with the same signature. Add bool WriteData(int * buffer, unsigned int length); in SerialClass.h just above the last curly brace. –  Femi Sep 16 '11 at 4:47
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I finally figured out how to do that. This is the modification I made to the code...

bool Serial::WriteData(int buffer, unsigned int nbChar)
{
    DWORD bytesSend;
    if (!WriteFile(this->hSerial, (LPVOID)&buffer, nbChar, &bytesSend, 0))
    {

        ClearCommError(this->hSerial, &this->errors, &this->status);
        return false;
    }
    else
        return true;
}

So, ultimately I had to declare the buffer as LPVOID in the write function and I directly transmit the decimal values without the need for any other conversion. yippee!!!

serial.WriteData(15,1);
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I'm not directly familiar with Windows serial functions, but something like this is likely to work:

bool Serial::WriteInt8(int number)
{
    unsigned char n = (unsigned char) number;
    DWORD bytesSend;
    if(!WriteFile(this->hSerial, &n, sizeof(n), &bytesSend, 0)) {
        ClearCommError(this->hSerial, &this->errors, &this->status);
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Note that this will behave incorrectly if you try to send a number greater than 255, as that's the largest value that can be represented as a single byte. You can fix that by changing the type of n to unsigned short, but be warned that you'll have to deal with endian issues if you take that approach.

share|improve this answer
    
WriteInt8 gives an error –  NineHourz Sep 16 '11 at 4:24
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