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If you have a query that is like so is there a better approach? Is there an alternate way to handle all of the "OR" statements? Just trying to figureout a way to get rid of all of the "ORs"

Version: SQL Server 2008 R2

Select ProductID
From product.Products
Where 
(Attribute1 <> 0
or Attribute2 <> 0
or Attribute3 <> 0
or Attribute4 <> 0
or Attribute5 <> 0
or Attribute6 <> 0
or Attribute7 <> 0
or Attribute8 <> 0
)
AND
(CatAttrib1 <> 0
or CatAttrib2 <> 0
or CatAttrib3 <> 0
)
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1  
This smells like horrible table design, and you need to normalize things. –  Brian Roach Sep 16 '11 at 3:31
    
You are correct....I can't control the data model unfortunately....you are right though it sucks. –  scarpacci Sep 16 '11 at 3:32
    
What is the data type? BIT, INT, ...? And can you add columns to the table? –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 16 '11 at 3:33
    
It is an Int data type –  scarpacci Sep 16 '11 at 3:35
1  
my. just spent 20 minutes writing a normalization primer in the answers, unaware of this discussion. –  cbrandolino Sep 16 '11 at 4:03
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could create a view, such as (assuming Attribute columns are INT-based, not BIT):

CREATE VIEW product.ViewProducts
AS
    SELECT Attribute1, Attribute2, ...
       Attributes = CASE 
            WHEN Attribute1 + Attribute2 + Attribute3 ... > 0 
            THEN 1 ELSE 0 END,
       CatAttrib1, CatAttrib2, ..., 
       CatAttribs = CASE
            WHEN CatAttrib1 + CatAttrib2 + CatAttrib3 ... > 0
            THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
    FROM product.Products;
GO

Now you can say:

SELECT ProductID
  FROM product.Products
  WHERE Attributes = 1
  AND CatAttribs = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
That is the only thing I was thinking was something similar....like do a sum of all of them and check where > 0. Thanks Aaron. –  scarpacci Sep 16 '11 at 3:43
    
watch out for negative number, they could level it up to 0 or less –  Satjinder Singh Bath Sep 16 '11 at 4:29
    
How about Attribute1 | Attribute2 | Attribute3 ... <> 0? –  Andriy M Sep 16 '11 at 5:01
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It looks like your database is not normalized.

Let's take a look at yor current scheme. You have something like this, right?

| id | name | attribute1| attribute2 | attribute3 | ... | 
--------------------------------------------------------
| 1  | car1 |     1     |      2     |     0      | ... |

With such a table, the ors are the way to go. I mean: there are other equally awkward constructs but more complex constructs you might use, but until you structure your data in a reasonable way you'll be forced trough lots of those issues.

I'll walk you trough the process of normalizing this part of your schema, and I'll drop some useful links in the meantime.

You want to have two tables, instead: one product table that looks like this:

| id | name |

And one product_attribute table similar to the following:

| product_id | attribute | value |

The example record above would be thusly represented in the new structure:

Table product:

| id | name | 
-------------
| 1  | car1 |

Table product_attribute:

| product_id | attribute | value |
----------------------------------
|      1     |     1     |   1   |
|      1     |     2     |   2   |
|      1     |     3     |   0   |

See what we did there? We made it so the product will have a one-to-many relationship with its product_attributes. This schema now follows the First Normal Form, as we are no more repeating groups across columns.

Let's go back to your query: you want to select every product which has no attribute of value zero. So, we join the two tables (this way every product will be connected to its product_attributes) and do our filtering:

 SELECT * FROM product 
   JOIN product_attribute
     ON (product.id = product_attribute.product_id)
   WHERE product_attribute.value <> 0

Looks way cleaner, does it?

Here's an msdn entry on SQL Server joins.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with your comments, but the OP said he can't change the schema. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 16 '11 at 4:03
    
@Aaron: Yep, saw it now -.-' –  cbrandolino Sep 16 '11 at 4:04
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While this seems ugly, this is just an UNPIVOT done twice, which can certainly be simplified by views. The first unpivot subquery gives you your Attributes column, the outer unpivot gives you your CatAttribs column. Then, you can do a simple WHERE clause at the end.

SELECT DISTINCT
        ProductID
        --,Attributes
        --,CatAttributes
    FROM
        (
            SELECT 
                    ProductID
                    ,Attributes
                    ,CatAttrib1
                    ,CatAttrib2
                    ,CatAttrib3
                FROM
                    (
                    SELECT 
                            ProductID
                            ,Attribute1
                            ,Attribute2
                            ,Attribute3
                            ,Attribute4
                            ,Attribute5
                            ,Attribute6
                            ,Attribute7
                            ,Attribute8
                            ,CatAttrib1
                            ,CatAttrib2
                            ,CatAttrib3
                        FROM 
                            product.Products) a
            UNPIVOT
                (
                Attributes FOR product.Products IN
                    (
                        Attribute1
                        ,Attribute2
                        ,Attribute3
                        ,Attribute4
                        ,Attribute5
                        ,Attribute6
                        ,Attribute7
                        ,Attribute8
                    )
                ) AS attrUnpivot
        ) c
UNPIVOT
    (
    CatAttributes FOR product.Products IN
        (
            CatAttrib1
            ,CatAttrib2
            ,CatAttrib3
        )
    ) AS catUnpivot
WHERE
    ProductID = catUnpivot.ProductID
    AND Attributes <> 0
    AND CatAttributes <> 0
share|improve this answer
    
You love unpivots, do you? :) –  cbrandolino Sep 16 '11 at 4:08
    
Not particularly. I just work with crap data like this daily. 8-) –  Sumo Sep 16 '11 at 4:09
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just a quick thought, sum up all of them and see if the result is greater than, make sure you read absolute value in case there are any negative numbers.

However I am not too sure, if you are going to win any performance here, but query might look bit neat.

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