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I tried to print the address of each character of std::string. But I amn't understanding what is happening internally with std::string that is resulting this output while for the array it is giving the address as I expected. Could someone please explain what is going on?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(){

   string str = "Hello";
   int a[] = {1,2,3,4,5};

   for( int i=0; i<str.length(); ++i )
      cout << &str[i] << endl;

   cout << "**************" << endl;

   for( int i=0; i<5; ++i )
      cout << &a[i] << endl;

    return 0;
}

Output:

Hello
ello
llo
lo
o
**************
0x7fff5fbff950
0x7fff5fbff954
0x7fff5fbff958
0x7fff5fbff95c
0x7fff5fbff960
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1  
The first tries to print a char*, which means it'll try to print a C-style string (until it hits \0 or touches an address it shouldn't have). The second thing you're doing is just running through an array of int and printing the address int*. Also be careful not to use the former in real code, because std::string is not guaranteed to be NULL-terminated. –  birryree Sep 16 '11 at 6:08
1  
The difference here is not caused by std::string, but caused by the different output logic between char* and int* for std::ostream. –  Thomson Sep 16 '11 at 6:11
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

When a std::ostream tries to print a char* it assumes it's a C-style string.

Cast it to a void* before printing and you will get what you expect:

cout << (void*) &str[i] << endl;
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or you may use the old printf

printf("\n%x",&s[i]);
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