Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So for my assignment I have to simulate basic machine language with C. The machine has 16 registers (reg[]), a program counter(pc) and memory (mem[]) all of which are unsigned chars. The instructions are read in from a file and are in the format:

B404 (1RXY = Load register R with the value at memory address XY). All numbers are in hex. C000 is the halt command.

Now my problem is that when I print out the instructions (when stored in a,b,c,d and cd) b and d have leading zeros. How do I get rid of them so the instruction is printed as above? (Line 48).

Also it appears some of my if statements aren't called as if I put a printf() in them and they are on the file it is never printed. (Lines 48 to 78).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main () {
FILE *file;
file = fopen("a3.txt","r");
unsigned int temp = 0;
unsigned char pc, mem[256], reg[16],a,b,c,d,cd;
unsigned int count;
count = 0;
pc = 0;
for (int i=0; i < 16;++i) {
    reg[i] = 0;
}

if (file == NULL) {
    printf("\n Error opening the file");
    exit(0);
}
for (int i=0; !feof(file); i += 2) {
    fscanf(file, "%X", &temp);
    mem[i] = ((temp & 0xFF00) >> 8);
    mem[i + 1] = (temp & 0xFF);
    if (feof(file)) {
        break; // exit from while
    }
    ++count;
}
int fclose(FILE *file);
/*while (mem[pc] != 0xC0) {*/
for (unsigned int i=0; i < count-1;++i) {
    if (mem[i] == 0xC0) {
        break; // exit from for
        exit(1);
    }
    cd = mem[pc + 1];
    a = (mem[pc] & 0xF0);
    b = (mem[pc] & 0xF);
    c = (mem[pc + 1] & 0xF0);
    d = (mem[pc + 1] & 0xF);
    printf("%02X ",pc);
    printf("%X%X%X%X - [",a,b,c,d);
    printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X ",reg[0],reg[1],reg[2],reg[3]);
    printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X ",reg[4],reg[5],reg[6],reg[7]);
    printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X ",reg[8],reg[9],reg[10],reg[11]);
    printf("%02X %02X %02X %02X]\n",reg[12],reg[13],reg[14],reg[15]);
    if (a == 0x1) {
        reg[b] = reg[cd];
    }
    if (a == 0x2) {
        reg[b] = cd;
        //printf("2 reporting in");
    }
    if (a == 0x3) {
        reg[cd] = reg[b];
    }
    if (a == 0x4) {
        reg[d] = reg[c];
    }
    if (a == 0x05) {
        reg[d] = (reg[b] + reg[c]);
        //printf("5 reporting in");
    }
    if (a == 0x7) {
        reg[d] = (reg[b] | reg[c]);
    }
    if (a == 0x8) {
        reg[d] = (reg[b] & reg[c]);
    }
    if (a == 0x9) {
        reg[d] = (reg[b] ^ reg[c]);
    }
    if (a == 0xA0) {
        reg[b] = (reg[b] >> reg[d]) | (reg[b] << (32 - reg[d]));
    }
    pc += 2;
    if (a == 0xB0) {
        //printf("B reporting in");
        if (reg[b] == reg[0]) {
            pc = cd;
        }
    }
}
return 0;
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
You might get more responses if you mark your previous questions as answered? –  StuartLC Sep 16 '11 at 6:37
1  
Its your assignment - and its supposed to be done by you ;) –  c69 Sep 16 '11 at 6:45
    
Well as you can see I have done it as much as I can. I just feel that there is something small that I am missing as to why it's not working as I want it to. –  RedFred Sep 17 '11 at 0:17
    
One bit of wisdom to take from Roland's code is functions. Functions make the world go round. It's your primary means of abstraction in C. All main() should be doing is interfacing between the real central function and the command-line parameters. –  luser droog Nov 4 '11 at 2:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To get the high bits of an unsigned char, use the following function:

unsigned char hi(unsigned char bits) {
  return (bits >> 4) & 0x0F;
}

And when you are doing the instruction dispatch, it is better to use a switch statement instead of an if ... else if ... else cascade. Then you can have a simple default: fprintf(stderr, "unknown instruction: %u\n", a); exit(1); for error detection.

Also, 0xA0 is not the value 10, its rather 160, so you should either write 10 or 0x0A.

Update:

The code for extracting a, b, c and d should look like this:

a = (mem[pc + 0] >> 4) & 0x0F;
b = (mem[pc + 0] >> 0) & 0x0F;
c = (mem[pc + 1] >> 4) & 0x0F;
d = (mem[pc + 1] >> 0) & 0x0F;

This is simple to read and easy to check for correctness. One can clearly see the uniform handling, and that each value is restricted to the range [0x00;0x0F].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'm going to try and implement a switch statement now. –  RedFred Sep 17 '11 at 0:19
    
If you want to know how an experienced programmer might implement this assignment, here it is: roland-illig.de/tmp/machine.c. But don't even think about submitting or copying this. You may want to compare the code though, to see how I have done the things. –  Roland Illig Sep 17 '11 at 12:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.