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I don't understand why the output of this program is Second method instead of First Method...

#include <iostream>

template <class T>
void assign(T& t1,T& t2){
    std::cout << "First method"<< std::endl;
}

template <class T>
void assign(T& t1,const T& t2) {
    std::cout << "Second method"<< std::endl;
}

class A
{
public:
    A(int a):_a(a){};
private:
    int _a;
    friend A operator+(const A& l, const A& r);
};

A operator+(const A& l, const A& r) {
friend A operator+(const A& l, const A& r);return A(l._a+r._a);
}

int main ()
{
    A a=1;
    const A b=2;
    assign(a,a+b);
}

However, when I change my main function to this:

int main ()
{
    A a=1;
    const A b=2;
    A c=a+b;
    assign(a,c);
}

The output is First method. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
up vote 15 down vote accepted
assign( a, a+b );

The result of a + b is an rvalue expression of type A that creates a temporary and you cannot bind it to a non-const reference, so it picks up the const overload as you are allowed to bind a const reference to a temporary.

assign( a, c );

In this case, the subexpression c is an lvalue expression and you are allowed to bind a non-const reference. In this case, because the non-const version is a perfect match with T=A it is preferred over the const overload that would require a conversion in the second argument from an lvalue of type A to const lvalue of type A.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Edited the post, hope it's okay. – Nawaz Sep 16 '11 at 8:04
    
@Nawaz: I am not too sure of that edit, but I'll leave it as it is. In the standard references bind to expressions not the other way around. Then again English is not my native language, and this expression is more convoluted so I would not know :) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 16 '11 at 8:15
1  
Searching the standard for uses of 'bound', 'bind' and 'binding', you can find uses that go both ways although binding a reference to an entity is a little more common. I think that it is supposed to be a symmetric action. – Charles Bailey Sep 16 '11 at 8:33

&t2 in your functions is taking a reference.

However, a+b cannot be bound to a normal reference, so it has to be passed as a const reference.

In your second main you're passing in a proper lvalue, so it can be modified by the function (and hence the const may change the meaning).

That's my guess, at least.

share|improve this answer
1  
Please don't answer if it's a guess. – quasiverse Sep 16 '11 at 7:35
    
Even if it is right? From the wording of it, it does seem as if mange does know what he/she is saying... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 16 '11 at 7:40
    
He definitely knows it's something like this and he knows that it's quite likely that he's right. But, as he said, it is a guess. – quasiverse Sep 16 '11 at 7:41
1  
OK, next time I just won't say it's a guess. I know I'm right, I'm just not sure of the precise terminology. – mange Sep 16 '11 at 7:44
    
@David: Indeed, that's how things like vector<foo>().swap(vec) works for shrinking a vector's allocation (and the seemingly-similar vec.swap(vector<foo>()) will not compile). (BTW, I am sorry for not clarifying this in my answer. I would have cleared it up, but like I mentioned, your answer is in any case better, so I don't need to keep mine around.) – Chris Jester-Young Sep 16 '11 at 7:46

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