Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to assign a random value to p1, p2, p3 and p4 for the following equation?

p1 y1 + p2 y2 + p3 y3 = p4

given that y1, y2 and y3 are variables to be solved.

share|improve this question
    
do the co-efficients need to have a particular distribution? Normal? Uniform? –  Andrew Walker Sep 16 '11 at 9:04
    
no, just random real or random integers –  penny Sep 16 '11 at 9:10
    
@penny: which probably means that you want a uniform distribution... –  Simon Sep 16 '11 at 13:16

5 Answers 5

The easiest(?) way is to Thread a list of random values over a replacement rule:

For example:

p1 y1 + p2 y2 + p3 y3 == p4 /. Thread[{p1, p2, p3, p4} -> RandomReal[{0, 1}, 4]]

(* 0.345963 y1 + 0.333069 y2 + 0.565556 y3 == 0.643419 *)

Or, inspired by Leonid, you can use Alternatives and pattern matching:

p1 y1 + p2 y2 + p3 y3 == p4 /. p1 | p2 | p3 | p4 :> RandomReal[]

Just for fun, here's one more, similar solution:

p1 y1 + p2 y2 + p3 y3 == p4 /. s_Symbol :> 
     RandomReal[]/;StringMatchQ[SymbolName[s], "p"~~DigitCharacter]

Where you could replace DigitCharacter with NumberString if you want it to match more than just p0, p1, ..., p9. Of course, for large expressions, the above won't be particularly efficient...

share|improve this answer
    
+1. If using Alternatives as I suggested, you should use a delayed rule, or all the numbers will be the same. –  Leonid Shifrin Sep 16 '11 at 12:40
    
@Leonid: oops... thought I did! –  Simon Sep 16 '11 at 12:42

The other answers are good, but if you do a lot of this sort of thing, I recommend naming your variables and coefficients in a more systematic way. This will not only allow you to write a much simpler rule, it will also make for much simpler changes when it's time to go from 3 equations to 4. For example:

In[1]:= vars   = Array[y, 3] 
Out[1]= {y[1], y[2], y[3]}

In[2]:= coeffs = Array[p, 4]
Out[2]= {p[1], p[2], p[3], p[4]}

You can be a little fancy when you make your equation:

In[3]:= vars . Most[coeffs] == Last[coeffs]
Out[3]= p[1] y[1] + p[2] y[2] + p[3] y[3] == p[4]

Substituting random numbers for the coefficients is now one one very basic rule:

In[4]:= sub = eqn /. p[_] :> RandomReal[] 
Out[4]= 0.281517 y[1] + 0.089162 y[2] + 0.0860836 y[3] == 0.915208

The rule at the end could also be written _p :> RandomReal[], if you prefer. You don't have to type much to solve it, either.

In[5]:= Reduce[sub]
Out[5]= y[1] == 3.25099 - 0.31672 y[2] - 0.305785 y[3]

As Andrew Walker said, you use Reduce to find all the solutions, instead of just some of them. You can wrap this up in a function which paramerizes the number of variables like so:

In[6]:= reduceRandomEquation[n_Integer] := 
          With[{vars = Array[y, n], coeffs = Array[p, n+1]},
            Reduce[vars . Most[coeffs]]

In[7]:= reduceRandomEquation[4]
Out[7]= y[1] == 2.13547 - 0.532422 y[2] - 0.124029 y[3] - 2.48944 y[4]
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Good to see you are back. –  Leonid Shifrin Sep 16 '11 at 12:53
    
It's good to be back. :) –  Pillsy Sep 16 '11 at 13:29

If you need solutions with values substituted in, one possible way to do this is:

f[y1_, y2_, y3_] := p1 y1 + p2 y2 + p3 y3 - p4
g = f[y1, y2, y3] /. p1 -> RandomReal[] /. p2 -> RandomReal[] /. 
   p3 -> RandomReal[] /. p4 -> RandomReal[]
Reduce[g == 0, {y1}]
Reduce[g == 0, {y2}]
Reduce[g == 0, {y3}]

If all you need is the solution to the equations:

f[y1_, y2_, y3_] := p1 y1 + p2 y2 + p3 y3 - p4
g = f[y1, y2, y3]
Solve[g == 0, {y1}]
Solve[g == 0, {y2}]
Solve[g == 0, {y3}]
share|improve this answer
    
what is the reduce function for? is it necessary? –  penny Sep 16 '11 at 9:34
1  
Reduce is similar to Solve, but will find all solutions. In this case solve would have been sufficient –  Andrew Walker Sep 16 '11 at 9:37
3  
@Andrew +1. Your solution could be somewhat simplified: f[y1, y2, y3] /. p1 | p2 | p3 | p4 :> RandomReal[]. –  Leonid Shifrin Sep 16 '11 at 9:38
    
oh in fact, i dont want to solve the problem yet. i just need to get the equations out. –  penny Sep 16 '11 at 9:46
    
@Leonid - thanks for that simplification, new things to try! :) –  Andrew Walker Sep 16 '11 at 10:13

If you can live without the symbolic coefficient names p1 et al, then you might generate as below. We take a variable list, and number of equations, and a range for the coefficients and rhs vector.

In[80]:= randomLinearEquations[vars_, n_, crange_] := 
 Thread[RandomReal[crange, {n, Length[vars]}].vars == 
   RandomReal[crange, n]]

In[81]:= randomLinearEquations[{x, y, z}, 2, {-10, 10}]

Out[81]= {7.72377 x - 4.18397 y - 4.58168 z == -7.78991, -1.13697 x + 
   5.67126 y + 7.47534 z == -6.11561}

It is straightforward to obtain variants such as integer coefficients, different ranges for matrix and rhs, etc.

Daniel Lichtblau

share|improve this answer

Another way:

dim = 3;
eq = Array[p, dim].Array[y, dim] == p[dim + 1];
Evaluate@Array[p, dim + 1] = RandomInteger[10, dim + 1]

Solve[eq, Array[y, dim]]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.