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I have an array in Bash, for example

array=(a c b f 3 5)

I need to sort the array. Not just displaying the content in a sorted way, but to get a new array with the sorted elements. The new sorted array can be a completely new one or the old one.

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7 Answers

Original response:

array=(a c b "f f" 3 5)
readarray -t sorted < <(for a in "${array[@]}"; do echo "$a"; done | sort)

output:

$ for a in "${sorted[@]}"; do echo "$a"; done
3
5
a
b
c
f f

Note this version copes with values that contains special characters or whitespace (except newlines)

Note readarray is supported in bash 4+.


Edit Based on the suggestion by @Dimitre I had updated it to:

readarray -t sorted < <(printf '%s\0' "${array[@]}" | sort -z | xargs -0n1)

which has the benefit of even understanding sorting elements with newline characters embedded correctly. Unfortunately, as correctly signaled by @ruakh this didn't mean the the result of readarray would be correct, because readarray has no option to use NUL instead of regular newlines as line-separators.

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Nice, it should be also noted that readarray is available since version 4 of bash. It could be shortened a bit: readarray -t sorted < <(printf '%s\n' "${array[@]}" | sort) –  Dimitre Radoulov Sep 16 '11 at 9:35
1  
@Dimitre: I took your suggestion and fixed the whitespace handling to work with anything (using nullchar-delimiters internally). Cheers –  sehe Sep 16 '11 at 9:42
    
Yes the sort -z is a useful improvement, I suppose the -z option is a GNU sort extention. –  Dimitre Radoulov Sep 16 '11 at 9:46
    
I don't know if I agree that that "understand[s] elements with newline characters embedded". If the filename is $'z\na', then it will successfully keep the z and a together during sorting, but they'll still end up in separate array-elements, with the $'\n' being swallowed. It's unfortunate that there's no way to tell readarray to use $'\0' instead of $'\n'. –  ruakh Feb 15 '12 at 14:39
    
@ruakh: Very good spot. Fixed the answer, thanks for the heads up –  sehe Feb 15 '12 at 15:49
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You don't really need all that much code:

IFS=$'\n' sorted=($(sort <<<"${array[*]}"))

Supports whitespaces in elements (as long as it's not a newline), and works in Bash 3.x.

e.g.:

$ array=("a c" b f "3 5")
$ IFS=$'\n' sorted=($(sort <<<"${array[*]}"))
$ printf "[%s]\n" "${sorted[@]}"
[3 5]
[a c]
[b]
[f]
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If you don't need to handle special shell characters in the array elements:

array=(a c b f 3 5)
sorted=($(printf '%s\n' "${array[@]}"|sort))

With bash you'll need an external sorting program anyway.

With zsh no external programs are needed and special shell characters are easily handled:

% array=('a a' c b f 3 5); printf '%s\n' "${(o)array[@]}" 
3
5
a a
b
c
f

ksh has set -s to sort ASCIIbetically.

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Very nice background info. I would almost ask for a demo on how ksh would use the set -s flag... but then again, the question is on bash, so that would be rather off-topic –  sehe Sep 16 '11 at 10:01
    
This should work with most KornShell implementations (for example ksh88 and pdksh): set -A array x 'a a' d; set -s -- "${array[@]}"; set -A sorted "$@" And, of course, the set command will reset the current positional parameters, if any. –  Dimitre Radoulov Sep 16 '11 at 10:07
    
You are a veritable fountain of shell knowledge. I'm sure you must have photographics memory or something, because this kind of subtle differences elude most of the other members of the human species :), +1 for the complete package of info –  sehe Sep 16 '11 at 10:08
    
@sehe, thanks! +1 for the readarray solution. –  Dimitre Radoulov Sep 16 '11 at 10:12
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In the 3-hour train trip from Munich to Frankfurt (which I had trouble to reach because Oktoberfest starts tomorrow) I was thinking about my first post. Employing a global array is a much better idea for a general sort function. The following function handles arbitary strings (newlines, blanks etc.):

declare BSORT=()
function bubble_sort()
{   #
    # @param [ARGUMENTS]...
    #
    # Sort all positional arguments and store them in global array BSORT.
    # Without arguments sort this array. Return the number of iterations made.
    #
    # Bubble sorting lets the heaviest element sink to the bottom.
    #
    (($# > 0)) && BSORT=("$@")
    local j=0 ubound=$((${#BSORT[*]} - 1))
    while ((ubound > 0))
    do
        local i=0
        while ((i < ubound))
        do
            if [ "${BSORT[$i]}" \> "${BSORT[$((i + 1))]}" ]
            then
                local t="${BSORT[$i]}"
                BSORT[$i]="${BSORT[$((i + 1))]}"
                BSORT[$((i + 1))]="$t"
            fi
            ((++i))
        done
        ((++j))
        ((--ubound))
    done
    echo $j
}

bubble_sort a c b 'z y' 3 5
echo ${BSORT[@]}

This prints:

3 5 a b c z y

The same output is created from

BSORT=(a c b 'z y' 3 5) 
bubble_sort
echo ${BSORT[@]}

Note that probably Bash internally uses smart-pointers, so the swap-operation could be cheap (although I doubt it). However, bubble_sort demonstrates that more advanced functions like merge_sort are also in the reach of the shell language.

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+1 for the effort –  Fredrik Pihl Sep 17 '11 at 20:25
    
Bubble sort? Wow.. Obama says "bubble sort would be the wrong way to go" -> youtube.com/watch?v=k4RRi_ntQc8 –  Robottinosino Apr 6 '13 at 5:20
1  
Well, it seems while the O-guy wanted to be smart he hadn't sensed that this is not a 50/50 chance question. A predecessor in the position of O-guy, let's tell him the B-guy, once did much better (Reynoldsburg, Ohio, Oct 2000): "I think if you know what you believe, it makes it a lot easier to answer questions. I can't answer your question." So this B-guy really knows something about Boolean logic. The O-guy doesn't. –  Andreas Spindler Apr 6 '13 at 14:19
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try this:

echo ${array[@]} | awk 'BEGIN{RS=" ";} {print $1}' | sort

Output will be:

3
5
a
b
c
f

Problem solved.

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Should edit this to put the output into a new array to fully answer his question. –  Peter Oct 27 '12 at 2:22
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I am not convinced that you'll need an external sorting program in Bash.

Here is my implementation for the simple bubble-sort algorithm.

function bubble_sort()
{   #
    # Sorts all positional arguments and echoes them back.
    #
    # Bubble sorting lets the heaviest (longest) element sink to the bottom.
    #
    local array=($@) max=$(($# - 1))
    while ((max > 0))
    do
        local i=0
        while ((i < max))
        do
            if [ ${array[$i]} \> ${array[$((i + 1))]} ]
            then
                local t=${array[$i]}
                array[$i]=${array[$((i + 1))]}
                array[$((i + 1))]=$t
            fi
            ((i += 1))
        done
        ((max -= 1))
    done
    echo ${array[@]}
}

array=(a c b f 3 5)
echo " input: ${array[@]}"
echo "output: $(bubble_sort ${array[@]})"

This shall print:

 input: a c b f 3 5
output: 3 5 a b c f
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If you can compute a unique integer for each element in the array, like this:

tab='0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'

# build the reversed ordinal map
for ((i = 0; i < ${#tab}; i++)); do
    declare -g ord_${tab:i:1}=$i
done

function sexy_int() {
    local sum=0
    local i ch ref
    for ((i = 0; i < ${#1}; i++)); do
        ch="${1:i:1}"
        ref="ord_$ch"
        (( sum += ${!ref} ))
    done
    return $sum
}

sexy_int hello
echo "hello -> $?"
sexy_int world
echo "world -> $?"

then, you can use these integers as array indexes, because Bash always use sparse array, so no need to worry about unused indexes:

array=(a c b f 3 5)
for el in "${array[@]}"; do
    sexy_int "$el"
    sorted[$?]="$el"
done

echo "${sorted[@]}"
  • Pros. Fast.
  • Cons. Duplicated elements are merged, and it can be impossible to map contents to 32-bit unique integers.
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