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Recently I came across a code snippet in a book which sets a Boolean value to a field like this

the input identifier is a List of Strings

if (identifier.size() >= 2) {
    int c = Integer.parseInt(identifier.get(1));
    bulk = (c & 4) == 4;
    hazardous = (c & 2) == 2;
    toxic = (c & 1) == 1;
}

what is the need for unary & operators here?Can't this be done using a simple c==4 etc instead of (c & 4)== 4 ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, this is a bitwise operation.

Imagine c=7. In that case all conditions would be true.

c = 7;
bulk = (c & 4) == 4; // true
hazardous = (c & 2) == 2; //true
toxic = (c & 1) == 1; //true

In binary, you'd have this:

c = 0111; //4-bit to simplify output
bulk = (c & 0100) == 0100; //
hazardous = (c & 0010) == 0010; //true
toxic = (c & 0001) == 0001; //true

Due to bitwise AND (&) you get 0111 & 0010 = 0010 etc.

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nice explanation –  Steve Sep 16 '11 at 11:09
    
@Steve thanks :) –  Thomas Sep 16 '11 at 11:12

This is added for bit masking

if c =3 then also it will be considered as toxic with this

 toxic = (c & 1) == 1;

if you write

 toxic = c  == 1;

then it would be stcict 1 check

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The variable c is clearly a bitmask. The effect of doing the bitwise & is mask off the other bits, leaving just the one bit still set. For example, this statement:

    bulk = (c & 4) == 4;

tests if bit 2 of c is set (and doesn't care about the other bits) - bit 2 being the 1 bit in this byte: 00000100

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c == 4 checks if c equals 4, meaning the binary form of c is 000...00100. (c & 4) == 4 if the binary form of c is the following xxx...xx1xx.

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