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What will happen if two modules import each other?

To generalize the problem, what about the cyclic imports in Python?

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2  
Good question; I believe the terminology is "circular imports" not "cyclic", though. I would imagine it'd be best if you change your title so other people can find this later on. –  Paolo Bergantino Apr 13 '09 at 16:18
5  
@Paolo I think it's cyclic .. not circular –  hasen Apr 13 '09 at 16:22
    
@hasen j: I wasn't sure which is why I didn't edit the question, but a google search provided a lot of articles that refer to it as circular, so I figured that was the term used. –  Paolo Bergantino Apr 13 '09 at 16:36
1  
@hansen j: I vote for "circular". Cyclic implies there's a loop -- or something -- which cycles around doing imports more than once. This is mutual references, which is most commonly described as circular. –  S.Lott Apr 13 '09 at 16:50
8  
Well in graphs we call it cyclic, if a cycle exists. –  Xolve Apr 14 '09 at 9:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 134 down vote accepted

There was a really good discussion on this over at comp.lang.python last year. It answers your question pretty thoroughly.

Imports are pretty straightforward really. Just remember the following:

'import' and 'from xxx import yyy' are executable statements. They execute when the running program reaches that line.

If a module is not in sys.modules, then an import creates the new module entry in sys.modules and then executes the code in the module. It does not return control to the calling module until the execution has completed.

If a module does exist in sys.modules then an import simply returns that module whether or not it has completed executing. That is the reason why cyclic imports may return modules which appear to be partly empty.

Finally, the executing script runs in a module named __main__, importing the script under its own name will create a new module unrelated to __main__.

Take that lot together and you shouldn't get any surprises when importing modules.

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@Shane, all ... what if my circular dependency go deeper. What if within xxx I've a module level variable (xxx.var) - which I want to import at module yyy: from xxx import var. This creates an importError exception for me - and according to your description that should be the case. When the interpreter see the line 'from yyy import var', the variable var is not yet defined. What can I do in this case? –  Uri Jun 19 '13 at 16:25
3  
This post became cyclically reverenced –  Mauro Baraldi Mar 27 at 2:50

If you do import foo inside bar and import bar inside foo, it will work fine. By the time anything actually runs, both modules will be fully loaded and will have references to each other.

The problem is when instead you do from foo import abc and from bar import xyz. Because now each module requires the other module to already be compiled (so that the name we are importing exists) before it can be compiled.

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4  
It seems that from foo import * and from bar import * will also work fine. –  Akavall May 12 '14 at 16:54
    
Check the edit to the post above using a.py/b.py. He does not use from x import y, and yet still gets the circular import error –  Greg Ennis Jun 30 '14 at 14:09
    
Thanks for sharing this - this is exactly the problem that I'm running into. Now I need to decide how I want to fix it... –  ArtOfWarfare Apr 27 at 17:02

Cyclic imports terminate, but you need to be careful not to use the cyclically-imported modules during module initialization.

Consider the following files:

a.py:

print "a in"
import sys
print "b imported: %s" % ("b" in sys.modules, )
import b
print "a out"

b.py:

print "b in"
import a
print "b out"
x = 3

If you execute a.py, you'll get the following:

$ python a.py
a in
b imported: False
b in
a in
b imported: True
a out
b out
a out

On the second import of b.py (in the second a in), the Python interpreter does not import b again, because it already exists in the module dict.

Edit: If you try to access b.x from a during module initialization, you will get an AttributeError.

Append the following line to a.py:

print b.x

Then, the output is:

$ python a.py
a in                    
b imported: False
b in
a in
b imported: True
a out
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "a.py", line 4, in <module>
    import b
  File "/home/shlomme/tmp/x/b.py", line 2, in <module>
    import a
 File "/home/shlomme/tmp/x/a.py", line 7, in <module>
    print b.x
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'x'

This is because modules are executed on import and at the time b.x is accessed, the line x = 3 has not be executed yet, which will only happen after b out.

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3  
You should provide information on "be careful not to use the cyclically-imported modules during module initialization". –  S.Lott Apr 13 '09 at 16:49
2  
Is the reason why 'a' is imported from 'b' (even though 'a' is already executing) is because 'a' is the executing script, and 'Finally, the executing script runs in a module named main, importing the script under its own name will create a new module unrelated to main.'? –  Taras Sep 9 '12 at 13:23
    
@Taras, good point, from which i have two conclusions: 1. It's ok to use circular imports 2. Always use a bootstrap script which import the main logic and modules with circular dependencies. –  warvariuc Aug 5 '13 at 9:50

I got an example here that struck me!

foo.py

import bar

class gX(object):
    g = 10

bar.py

from foo import gX

o = gX()

main.py

import foo
import bar

print "all done"

At the command line: $ python main.py

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "m.py", line 1, in <module>
    import foo
  File "/home/xolve/foo.py", line 1, in <module>
    import bar
  File "/home/xolve/bar.py", line 1, in <module>
    from foo import gX
ImportError: cannot import name gX
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How did you fix this? I'm trying to understand circular import to fix a problem of my own that looks very similar to what you're doing... –  c089 Aug 9 '10 at 6:53
7  
Errm... I think I fixed my problem with this incredibly ugly hack. {{{ if not 'foo.bar' in sys.modules: from foo import bar else: bar = sys.modules['foo.bar'] }}} Personally, I think circular imports are a HUGE warning sign on bad code design... –  c089 Aug 9 '10 at 7:01
2  
@c089, or you could just move import bar in foo.py to the end –  warvariuc Aug 5 '13 at 9:52
1  
If bar and foo both must use gX, the 'cleanest' solution is to put gX in another module and have both foo and bar import that module. (cleanest in the sense that there are no hidden semantic dependencies.) –  Tim Wilder Dec 17 '13 at 20:32

Ok, I think I have a pretty cool solution. Let's say you have file a and file b. You have a def or a class in file b that you want to use in module a, but you have something else, either a def, class, or variable from file a that you need in your definition or class in file b. What you can do is, at the bottom of file a, after calling the function or class in file a that is needed in file b, but before calling the function or class from file b that you need for file a, say import b Then, and here is the key part, in all of the definitions or classes in file b that need the def or class from file a (let's call it CLASS), you say from a import CLASS

This works because you can import file b without Python executing any of the import statements in file b, and thus you elude any circular imports.

For example:

File a:

class A(object):

     def __init__(self, name):

         self.name = name

CLASS = A("me")

import b

go = B(6)

go.dostuff

File b:

class B(object):

     def __init__(self, number):

         self.number = number

     def dostuff(self):

         from a import CLASS

         print "Hello " + CLASS.name + ", " + str(number) + " is an interesting number."

Voila.

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from a import CLASS doesn't actually skip executing all the code in a.py. I think this is what is really happening here: –  mfripp Jun 4 at 7:17
    
from a import CLASS doesn't actually skip executing all the code in a.py. This is what really happens: (1) All the code in a.py gets run as a special module "__main__". (2) At import b, the top-level code in b.py gets run (defining class B) and then control returns to "__main__". (3) "__main__" eventually passes control to go.dostuff(). (4) when dostuff() comes to import a, it runs all the code in a.py again, this time as the module "a"; then it imports the CLASS object from the new module "a". So actually, this would work equally well if you used import a anywhere in b.py. –  mfripp Jun 4 at 7:28

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