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i have a .htaccess file in my root directory (public_html/) that looks like this: (XXX.XX.XX.XX stands for an IP)

RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^XXX.XX.XX.XX$ [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.justadomain.tld [R=301,L]

There are also .htaccess files in subfolders und folders of subfolders, but I want this rewrite rule to work in all directories all over the account whether there exists a .htaccess or not, without copying this rule in every single file. The rules in the existing .htaccess files should continue working.

Thanks in advance for your answers!

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Congratulations, you're already done! This is the way .htaccess files work by default. :) Is it not working as it should? –  Pekka 웃 Sep 16 '11 at 11:25
    
But if there is a .htaccess file existing in a subfolder, this rule isn't working, only the rules from the folder's .htaccess file work. –  Fabian Sep 16 '11 at 11:27
    
that's strange, that shouldn't be. Do the rules in the sub-htaccess contradict the rule you show in any way? –  Pekka 웃 Sep 16 '11 at 11:28
    
No, they do not contradict in any way. It seems, that if a .htaccess file exist in a folder, this file is used and the .htaccess files below are ignored. –  Fabian Sep 16 '11 at 11:33
    
Any suggestions what I could try? I've been searching for a solution for days... –  Fabian Sep 16 '11 at 12:08
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to add the following line into each .htaccess in subfolders if you want to have rewrite rules from parent .htaccess to be executed as well:

RewriteOptions inherit

This forces the current configuration to inherit the configuration of the parent. In per-virtual-server context, this means that the maps, conditions and rules of the main server are inherited. In per-directory context this means that conditions and rules of the parent directory's .htaccess configuration are inherited.

Rules inherited from the parent scope are applied after rules specified in the child scope.

http://httpd.apache.org/docs/current/mod/mod_rewrite.html#rewriteoptions


Alternatively -- move your "global" rule(s) from .htaccess into VirtualHost context (that's only if you can edit server config files, of course).

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Thank you so far. But that means that ALL parent rules are adopted and I have to edit every single file? Also: "Rules inherited from the parent scope are applied after rules specified in the child scope.". This means that if there's a conflict, the parent rule will work, right? –  Fabian Sep 16 '11 at 17:04
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1) Yes, it will apply ALL rules from ONE parent folder. To have it apply rules from ALL parent folders you will have to edit all .htaccess files (you are correct on this one). 2) Not necessarily -- it all depends on rule/conflict and whole rewrite logic, really. But if URL (or other "subject") will remain the same then parent rule most likely will can take over. There is only 1 proper way to find out how it will work on your setup -- testing it on real system with real examples. –  LazyOne Sep 16 '11 at 17:54
    
Thank you for your detailed answer! (Can't give you +1 rep because of my own rep..) –  Fabian Sep 17 '11 at 8:20
    
@Fabian But you can mark this answer as accepted then :) (if you think it's useful, of course) –  LazyOne Sep 17 '11 at 8:50
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Interesting but what I understand from the doc is "In per-directory context this means that conditions and rules of the parent directory's .htaccess configuration are inherited." <- by directory they mean <directory> directives. You wouldn't have different directories in the same virtualhost. Don't mix up directories and folders. In a "folders" context, you don't need that directive. There's something wrong with your server configuration. –  Capsule Sep 28 '11 at 9:27
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