Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to write a simple metronome, by playing a system sound every 0.25 seconds. I use GCD to play the clicks on a separate thread but the playing is uneven with the clicks coming sometimes as two quick beats followed by a slower beat. I Logged the time when the if statement in the loop is executed and its right on 0.25 seconds. I'm hoping I don't have to use Audio Queue Services. Any suggestions?

- (IBAction)start:(id)sender 
{
    dispatch_queue_t clickQueue; // the queue to run the metronome clicker
    dispatch_queue_t mainQueue; // I access the main queue to demonstrate how to change UIKit items
    //clickQueue = dispatch_queue_create("clickQueue", NULL);
    clickQueue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_HIGH, 0);
    mainQueue = dispatch_get_main_queue();
    dispatch_async(clickQueue, ^{
        double timeWas = [NSDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate];
        //delay by a 1/10 of a second so the first few clicks don't bunch up.
        double timeIs = [NSDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate]  - 0.1; 
        // playing starts out as NO because it gets switched at the end of the loop
        // and the PlaySystemSound block isn't off the queue yet. There is probably a
        // better way to do this.
        while (playing) {
            timeIs = [NSDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate] ;
            if ((timeIs - timeWas) > (60.0/240)) {
                AudioServicesPlaySystemSound(sound);
                timeWas = timeIs;
                // I want to flast the 200 label between orange and black but I have to access
                // user interface objects from the queue that they are running in, usually the
                // main queue.
                dispatch_async(mainQueue, ^{
                    if (flash)
                        [bpm setTextColor:[UIColor orangeColor]];
                    else
                        [bpm setTextColor:[UIColor blackColor]];
                    flash = !flash;
                });
            }
        }
    });
    playing = !playing;
    if (playing) 
        [startButton setTitle:@"Stop" forState:UIControlStateNormal];
    else
        [startButton setTitle:@"Start" forState:UIControlStateNormal];
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use an NSTimer for the time, and AVFoundation for the sounds.

share|improve this answer
2  
Even if you get the NSTimer to fire as precisely as you need it to, the lag introduced by AVFoundation will throw off your timing. It may be close enough to be acceptable in some situations, but for a metronome, you're going to want much more precise timing. – jn_pdx Mar 15 '13 at 10:02

The folks who put together http://www.metronomeonline.com/ did a pretty good job of dealing with the timing issues, though they weren't developing for any specific hardware/OS. I believe the way they did it was by creating pre-recorded .wav/.mp3 files for a few seconds for each tempo, then looped them. The loop rate is calculated to be tempo-accurate. By making the loop event the only thing that depends on client timing, they reduce timing errors.

share|improve this answer

A better approach would be to use a repeating NSTimer with the required interval. Your method churns the CPU.

share|improve this answer

I went down the same route myself at one point with my metronome app. Unfortunately, you'll never get the precision you want with the high-level APIs like PlaySystemSound -- they just don't respond quickly enough.

More than likely, if you want true precision with your tempos and the sounds you play as your "clicks" you'll want to use Audio Units -- you might be able to get away with Audio Queue Services -- I didn't experiment much with it, realizing that I was going to need to get low-level at some point anyway, and opting to go all out.

share|improve this answer
    
I know you answered this a while ago, but just to clarify, did you use NSTimer to schedule your Audio Units on a separate thread? Would you take a different approach with a metronome app today? Any resources you might point to? – blwinters Sep 12 '15 at 18:03
    
You wouldn't use an NSTimer with AudioUnits. I recommend reading up on how to use AudioUnits, as they are probably the only reliable solution for building a metronome. – jn_pdx Sep 13 '15 at 1:15
    
Thanks. I'll probably start with this framework to ease the learning curve: theamazingaudioengine.com – blwinters Sep 13 '15 at 1:22

I would try to use :

void dispatch_after(
   dispatch_time_t when,
   dispatch_queue_t queue,
   dispatch_block_t block);

You can also read http://atastypixel.com/blog/experiments-with-precise-timing-in-ios/ which is very interesting in your context...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.