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I apologize beforehand, because this may well be a very dumb question. I've read two books on PHP so far (which included mySQL and JavaScript). I get the basic coding part, syntax and all, which is really what the books were about.

But what I don't really get, and what the books just fail to mention, is where to start with using the actual code.

I have a static website at the moment which is written in HTML and CSS. I want to implement a dynamic part to that website: the main parts would be a login section, member section and the ability for the users to post to a system similar to a forum.

I'm at a loss on how to do this. I've looked into frameworks and content management systems, but to be honest, I'm not sure what those are supposed to do. I get that they are supposed to make programming easier and faster, but how do they do that?

I read the user manual for CodeIgniter, but I still don't know how to combine it with my html/css pages, or how to implement the system on my website that I want. I tried looking on other websites on information, but everyone seems to say different things. Can I write my own code? Would that be advisable, or inadvisable? Where do I write the code, in which files?

I'm not against using frameworks or CMS or anything, but I really want to understand the underlying processes of my website. If I just borrow code, and something goes wrong, I'll end up spending days finding what went wrong.

Please, any help would be very much appreciated, I'm at a complete loss at the moment. I feel like I'm just missing a few crucial snippets of information necessary to get going; or maybe it's just because there's so much stuff out there, frameworks and cms and portals and things like phpmyadmin and easyphp and ... well, you get the gist of it - there's just so much out there, and I really don't know where to start.

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1  
Start here: w3schools.com –  Daи Sep 16 '11 at 13:20
4  
Start by blocking w3schools.com from your search results. –  Wesley Murch Sep 16 '11 at 13:24
1  
@digitaltoday: w3schools was somewhat useful long ago, now it's more a nuisance, teaching people things the wrong way. –  CodeCaster Sep 16 '11 at 13:34
    
I have gone to W3schools way back when I was still taking a webdesign class, but I've always found the website to be confusing and lacking of information, to be honest. –  Lane Sep 16 '11 at 13:57
    
note that php is not limited to creating html or plain text. PHP can emit binary data. If you were crazy, you could build a php script which emitted a windows executable. –  horatio Sep 16 '11 at 14:05
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7 Answers

I'm not against using frameworks or CMS or anything, but I really want to understand the underlying processes of my website. If I just borrow code, and something goes wrong, I'll end up spending days finding what went wrong.

You simply shouldn't start programming on a project which you want to use in a 'live' situation. Not even if it's only for fun; if someone hacks your site because of an obvious leak you missed by lack of experience, other visitors could be harmed (i.e. getting their email addresses and/or passwords published, or get malware installed through your site). It isn't very likely to happen, but it can.

You're saying you've read two books on programming. Did you apply the things that were discussed, or did you simply read it and took it for granted? You really should try to understand the basics of programming, using hands-on experience.

There's two roads you can walk: create a login/forum/CMS system yourself, with or without the use of frameworks, or you can just download something like Wordpress and create templates for it. There's not much programming to the latter, but you can have a site live quickly that way.

Whenever you decide to code it all together yourself, you'll have to choose whether you want to use an object oriented approach, or just stuff everything into the .php file where you need it, surrounded by the html you've already written. You could also just use a template engine like Smarty, so you'll barely have to use html and php together. Or, maybe the most viable solution, take the time to get used to a certain framework, for example the Zend Framework. This has got everything you need, from session handling to database access to a Model-View-Controller framework (used for separating views, data and logic), but then you'd have to learn how to program against that framework.

There's indeed a lot of options, but I hope this helps somewhat. :-P

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The books I read on programming in php - I did do some of the examples throughout the book, which weren't a problem, but because the syntax is so similar to Java and I've used Java a lot in the past, I figured that the coding itself wouldn't be much of a problem in the long run. Was that dumb? Should I just try more? –  Lane Sep 16 '11 at 13:47
    
And it does help, thank you :-)) –  Lane Sep 16 '11 at 13:48
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I think if you want to understand better the concepts of where to implement the parts (CSS, HTML, Dynamic code), try to learn MVC concepts first -> If I'm not wrong codeIgnator is a MVC Framework like. Try to look into kohana Framework, personally I like the way of HMVC works. Understand the concept of OO also.

http://kohanaframework.org/

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You can place PHP anywhere inside the HTML or XHTML markup like so:

<html>
<body>

<?php
echo "Hello World";
?>

</body>
</html> 

for most servers, you will need to name the file with a .php extension.

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4  
    
What is wrong with W3Schools? It gives the basics. –  Todd Moses Sep 16 '11 at 13:25
    
-1 : The actual PHP reference site is here: php.net "What is wrong with W3Schools?" is that they pose as an authority while giving bad examples, misleading information, and scamming people into buying worthless "certification". –  Wesley Murch Sep 16 '11 at 13:26
    
I think mixing up code it cause a lot of mess. Even for a starter programmer, is better to learn how to do things the write way, it is better to separate your code like MVC do, maintenance would be easy.. When I learned the concepts of a MVC framework my job speed up so much that I thoutgh why I didn't before.. –  B4NZ41 Sep 16 '11 at 13:26
    
@Wesley Murch I know that I am a pro PHP developer. However, for a newby who wants to know how to put code on a page, that is not the correct site. –  Todd Moses Sep 16 '11 at 13:28
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  • on the web, there are servers and clients.
  • client asks the server for something
  • server responds something
  • over n over
  • everything is on your server (CSS, JS, images...etc)
  • client asks for various resources
  • if your server has PHP installed, you can run PHP on your server
  • PHP can generate any text output, which gonna be the response
  • so you can generate HTML as well
  • if you read two PHP books, you should know how to output HTML
  • so you can write what you want
  • sooner or later you will realize, that it's hard to maintain your code "something messy"
  • you will search for better practices, better techniques
  • over n over
  • when you search and try better practices, you will realize that not you are the only one who want it to do better
  • so you will find frameworks based on best practices

http://symfony.com/doc/2.0/book/

More here.

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I wouldn't recommend that your first PHP project use either MVC or a framework, that's a learning curve that's a bit too steep IMO. It's going to be enough work learning PHP/mySQL itself, never mind PHP plus the concepts of MVC and other patterns, plus the idiosyncratic complexities of some particular framework. In addition, building and having to maintain a monolithic project will later give you insight into why MVC frameworks are an improvement.

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I'm guessing the books you read explained that you can stick PHP inline with HTML markup and it'll execute, and all that stuff. If not, then those books probably suck, and you should try to get your money back. Your question really seems to be centered around frameworks and content management systems.

We'll start with the easiest to setup one first: Content management systems These basically are pre-made websites that do exactly what they say, they let you manage content. One of the more popular ones would be Wordpress, which, by default, allows you to post articles onto a website (and let users comment on those articles, etc) using a simple, easy to use interface in the "backend/admin panel" section. Generally, a CMS is designed to make it easy for a user to have a website without any of the fuss of writing code, or even having to know HTML. So, with your newfound knowledge of PHP, what can you do with these? To be honest, not a lot, until you read through the developer documentation and API documentation. You can certainly hack away at it, but it will take time to really be able to do what you want, in terms of customizing a CMS. This depends a bit on the CMS, though, and some are easier to work with than others. But there's an added learning curve while you understand how to do things.

So, Frameworks. Frameworks are an added layer of PHP that can help your development process, by forcing organization of code (most frameworks use an Model-View-Controller pattern, known as MVC), or added security (by preventing SQL Injections from happening, and other nasty things that PHP lets you do). Most frameworks will result in PHP code that is separated from the HTML, which is generally a good thing. The downside: frameworks means more learning, usually a fair amount of learning, as they each have their own way of doing things. But the code you produce with them is generally going to be cleaner, and as you work with a certain framework more, you'll write better code (this is actually true of any programming language). Often, most frameworks have a basic tutorial along the lines of Hello World to get you started, and to let you understand the structure and how the view files work with the controller and model. It's hard to say which PHP framework is "better", since they all have upsides and downsides, so pick one you feel is good and start messing around with it. Run through some tutorials, and if it stinks, go find another one.

Good luck!

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This is really helpful to me! I have read about inline php yes, and plenty of it to be honest heh. I guess that was a bit vague in my question. I guess this means I'll go with a framework and go read up on the MVC pattern, and see which framework I want to use. Thanks so much for the help and tips! –  Lane Sep 16 '11 at 14:03
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You have much to learn, and what you want to acheive will not happen over night.

Lets take a very basic example.

Say you have the following HTML page:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>My HTML Page</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>This is my HTML page</h1>
    <p>Nice, isn't it?</p>
  </body>
</html>

...and lets say that you wanted to put a count of 1 to 10 on it. You could do this:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>My HTML Page</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>This is my HTML page</h1>
    <p>Nice, isn't it?</p>
    <div>1</div>
    <div>2</div>
    <div>3</div>
    <div>4</div>
    <div>5</div>
    <div>6</div>
    <div>7</div>
    <div>8</div>
    <div>9</div>
    <div>10</div>
  </body>
</html>

...but in PHP, you can simply do this:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>My HTML Page</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>This is my HTML page</h1>
    <p>Nice, isn't it?</p>
<?php
    for ($i = 1; $i <= 10; $i++) {
      echo "<div>$i</div>\n";
    }
?>
  </body>
</html>

...and the generated HTML will be (effectively) the same. Not that useful I know, but if you have done that on a static page, you would have had to write out all those divs.

Now lets say you want to be able to control the number of the count with a URL parameter. You can do this:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>My HTML Page</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>This is my HTML page</h1>
    <p>Nice, isn't it?</p>
<?php
    for ($i = 1; $i <= $_GET['count']; $i++) {
      echo "<div>$i</div>\n";
    }
?>
  </body>
</html>

Now, the page has as many numbers displayed as you pass in the count URL parameter, so you can call http://mydomain/myscript.php?count=10 top get the same result as before. You could also call http://mydomain/myscript.php?count=20 and it would now have 20 'rows'.

I know the above examples are neither exciting, nor useful, but hopefully it will demonstrate how to work your PHP code into your HTML.

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It is obvious but important to note that the PHP is executed on the server, so the first example with plain html (10 divs), and the second one emitting the divs with a loop in php will look identical to the client's browser (plain old html) –  horatio Sep 16 '11 at 14:02
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