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Q: Is there any difference for the client between WCF async service call and async client call?

Right now I have a contract that looks like this

[ServiceContract]
public interface IFoo
{        
    [OperationContract(AsyncPattern = true)]
    IAsyncResult BeginGetFoo();

    [OperationContract]
    FooResult EndGetFoo(IAsyncResult asyncResult);  

    ...
}

And I was thinking to refactor it to something like this (and just call it asynchronously later from a WPF client).

[ServiceContract]
public interface IFoo
{        
    [OperationContract]
    FooResult GetFoo(); 

    ...
}

The reason is that I want to simplify service contract for the client.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's essentially no difference (if it's written correctly - notice the corrected signature below: the Begin operation needs to take an AsyncCallback and an object parameter, and the End operation must not be decorated with [OperationContract]). If you want to handle the threading yourself, then feel free to declare it as a synchronous operation; if you want to let WCF handle that, then go with the async pattern. But the request which the client will send to the server is the same in both cases.

[ServiceContract] 
public interface IFoo 
{         
    [OperationContract(AsyncPattern = true)] 
    IAsyncResult BeginGetFoo(AsyncCallback callback, object state); 
    FooResult EndGetFoo(IAsyncResult asyncResult);   

    ... 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
thanks this make sense –  oleksii Sep 16 '11 at 16:46
    
Is there a similar way to have a 'simple' interface for the client when using task-based async implementation (i.e. where the operation declares its return type as Task<T>). The difference there is that all the examples I have seen only have one method declared for the operation (rather than 2 as above) and that one method has a return type of Task<T> -- which would seem to imply that the client is going to receive a result of Task<T>, which I would like to avoid. –  Terry Coatta Feb 19 at 16:33
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