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Please take a look at the following snippet from ipython:

In [122]: len(netean)
Out[122]: 150

In [123]: len(nwrongpea)
Out[123]: 100

In [124]: len(set.intersection(set(nwrongpea), set(netean)))
Out[124]: 8

In [125]: len(set(nwrongpea) - set(netean))
Out[125]: 90

In [126]: len(set(netean) - set(nwrongpea))
Out[126]: 142

I am going crazy - since these two lists have the 8 elements in common (based on what intersection answers), how is it possible that [125] returns 90 ? Shouldn't that be 92 ?

Have I forgotten something from set theory ?

Thanks !

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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It looks like one(or two) of this collections have some duplicate elements. So creating sets from them gives you sets with less number of elements..

Try len(set(natean)) + len(set(nwrongpea)) and you'll see.

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2  
Actually there are 10 duplicates: (A u B) = (A - B) + (A !u B) + (B - A). In this case (A u B) = 90 + 8 + 142 = 240 –  fceruti Sep 16 '11 at 14:38
1  
@fceruti, you're right.. –  sinan Sep 16 '11 at 14:41
    
Thanks 4 the answers! I dont have the data right now but probably the nwrongpea list has two duplicates. The data was not supposed to have duplicates thats why I didnt think of that. My mind is in peace now :-)was not supposed to have duplicates thats why I didnt think of that. My mind is in peace now :-) –  Serafeim Sep 16 '11 at 17:40

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