Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to implement a mock for an interface that is defined something like:

class Foo
{
public:
  void sendEvent(int id) const = 0;
}

My mock class needs to save all event id's sent to the class. This is how I intended to do it.

class FooMock : Foo
{
private: 
  m_vector std::vector<int>;
public:
  void sendEvent(int id) const {m_vector.push_back(id);}

}

But obviously the compiler refuses that construction. Are there any solutions to this (assuming the interface could not be changed)?

I realize that I can use two classes for this. But isn't there a way to shut the compiler up and allow me to to this, similar to const_cast?

share|improve this question
    
mutable turned out to be impossible due to that we work in a model driven environment that doesn't support mutable at all. –  Eric Decker Sep 16 '11 at 15:02
    
But const_cast<FooMock*>(this)->m_vector.push_back(id); works fine, I was not aware of this possibility. Thanks! –  Eric Decker Sep 16 '11 at 15:04
    
@Erik: Did mutable solve the issue or not? I find it strange that it wouldn't solve it... but your comment says so, and on the other hand you have accepted an answer that proposes the use of mutable... If mutable did not solve it, why? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 16 '11 at 15:20
    
Is the const there for a reason? Did the designer put const here just because it's prettier? –  curiousguy Nov 2 '11 at 21:42
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can make the vector mutable so that it can be modified from within const methods, like this:

mutable std::vector<int> m_vector;

Note however that this makes the vector mutable from all methods. If you only want to write to it from a single method, a const_cast is less invasive, in that you cast the constness of this away just for a single call:

FooMock * const that = const_cast<FooMock * const>(this);
that->m_vector.push_back(id);

I'm being a bit pedantic here - inside a const method, this has the type T const * const (so both the object being pointed to as well as the pointer itself are const). The const_cast just casts away the constness of the object, but not of the pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
mutable! I should have known. Thanks a lot! –  Eric Decker Sep 16 '11 at 14:53
add comment

Another method without mutable (when that is not available) and const_cast is using pointer-members. The pointees don't follow the constness.

class FooMock : Foo
{
private: 
  boost::scoped_ptr<std::vector<int> > m_vector;
public:
  FooMock() : m_vector(new std::vector<int>) { }
  void sendEvent(int id) const {m_vector->push_back(id);}
}

When possible, I would use mutable for mocking.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: That's a neat trick I didn't know yet! –  Frerich Raabe Sep 16 '11 at 18:15
add comment

const-ness of a member-function is a part of the function signature. You cannot get rid of it.

However, you can define the member as mutable, which you want to mutate in a const member function. The keyword mutable would make the member mutable/modifiable even in a const-member function and even if the object is const.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could mark m_vector as mutable:

mutable std::vector<int> m_vector;

mutable generates a bit of controversy similar to const_cast, and it results in a bit of a theoretical discussion about what it really means to be const. Basically it would be justified here as long as the external behavior remains const-like, which I assume is true looking at this example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.