Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the latest versions of MongoDB (on a Win 64 Server) and the C# driver. I have a windows service that is doing 800 reads and updates per minute, and after a few minutes the current threads used goes above 200 and then every single mongodb call gives this error:

System.IO.IOException: Unable to read data from the transport connection: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond. ---> System.Net.Sockets.SocketException: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond
   at System.Net.Sockets.Socket.Receive(Byte[] buffer, Int32 offset, Int32 size, SocketFlags socketFlags)
   at System.Net.Sockets.NetworkStream.Read(Byte[] buffer, Int32 offset, Int32 size)

I have an index on the fields that is reading by so that's not the issue. Here is the code for the read:

public static UserUpdateMongo Find(int userId, long deviceId)
{
    return Collection().Find(
        Query.And(
            Query.EQ("UserId", userId),
            Query.EQ("DeviceId", deviceId))).FirstOrDefault();
}

I instantiate the connection like so:

var settings = new MongoServerSettings
{
    Server = new MongoServerAddress(segments[0], Convert.ToInt32(segments[1])),MaxConnectionPoolSize = 1000};
    Server = MongoServer.Create(settings);
}

Am I doing something wrong or is there an issue with the C# driver? Help!!

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The C# driver has a connection pool, and the maximum size of the connection pool is 100 by default. So you should never see more than 100 connections to mongod from a single C# client process. The 1.1 version of the C# driver did have an occasional problem under heavy load, where an error on one connection could result in a storm of disconnects and connects. You would be able to tell if that was happening to you by looking at the server logs, where a log entry is written every time a connection is opened or closed. If so, can you try the 1.2 C# driver that was released this week?

You should not have needed to create a queue of pending updates. The connection pool acts as a queue of sorts by limiting the number of concurrent requests.

Let me know if you can find anything in the server logs, and if there is anything further I can help you with.

share|improve this answer
1  
Right, I found out that the size of the connection pool was 100 because the connections would keep incrementing until it reached 100 and then every request would cause the "Unable to read data from the transport connection" error. I tried increasing the limit to 200 but the same thing happened, the connections would build up to 200 and then it'd start erroring again. However, the connections aren't increasing due to an error, they are just building up and not releasing and then erroring once it has too many for the C# driver to handle (or once the set limit is reached.) –  Justin Sep 20 '11 at 13:19
1  
I read that the Mongo server object is thread safe and is supposed to act like a queue for concurrent requests, however it seems in reality it can't handle serious load. Oh well, thanks for your response, I'll try the 1.2 driver but it sounds like it won't have any effect since there are no errors being generated besides the transport error above once the connections are high. –  Justin Sep 20 '11 at 13:20
    
Actually I just checked and I'm already using 1.2.0.4274. –  Justin Sep 20 '11 at 13:22
add comment

The solution was to stop saving records on each individual thread and to start adding them to a "pending to save" list in memory. Then have a separate thread and that handles all saves to mongodb synchronously. I don't know why the async calls cause the C# driver to trip up, but this is working beautifully now. Here is some sample code if others run into this problem:

public static class UserUpdateSaver
    {
        public static List<UserUpdateView> PendingUserUpdates;

        public static void Initialize()
        {
            PendingUserUpdates = new List<UserUpdateView>();
            var saveUserUpdatesTime = Convert.ToInt32(ConfigurationBL.ReadApplicationValue("SaveUserUpdatesTime"));
            LogWriter.Write("Setting up timer to save user updates every " + saveUserUpdatesTime + " seconds", LoggingEnums.LogEntryType.Warning);
            var worker = new BackgroundWorker();
            worker.DoWork += delegate(object s, DoWorkEventArgs args)
            {
                while (true)
                {//process pending user updates every x seconds.
                    Thread.Sleep(saveUserUpdatesTime * 1000);
                    ProcessPendingUserUpdates();
                }
            };
            worker.RunWorkerAsync();
        }

        public static void AddUserUpdateToSave(UserUpdateView userUpdate)
        {
            Monitor.Enter(PendingUserUpdates);
            PendingUserUpdates.Add(userUpdate);
            Monitor.Exit(PendingUserUpdates);
        }

        private static void ProcessPendingUserUpdates()
        {
            //get pending user updates.
            var pendingUserUpdates = new List<UserUpdateView>(PendingUserUpdates);
            if (pendingUserUpdates.Count > 0)
            {
                var startDate = DateTime.Now;

                foreach (var userUpdate in pendingUserUpdates)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        UserUpdateStore.Update(userUpdate);
                    }
                    catch (Exception exc)
                    {
                        LogWriter.WriteError(exc);
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        Monitor.Enter(PendingUserUpdates);
                        PendingUserUpdates.Remove(userUpdate);
                        Monitor.Exit(PendingUserUpdates);
                    }
                }

                var duration = DateTime.Now.Subtract(startDate);
                LogWriter.Write(String.Format("Processed {0} user updates in {1} seconds",
                    pendingUserUpdates.Count, duration.TotalSeconds), LoggingEnums.LogEntryType.Warning);
            }
            else
            {
                LogWriter.Write("No user updates to process", LoggingEnums.LogEntryType.Warning);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
This ended up not working, doing saves in a simple for loop just isn't fast enough. I need to be able to do multi-threaded saves, otherwise I won't be able to keep up with the load, which is now ~15K inserts/updates every 10 seconds. –  Justin Sep 22 '11 at 14:01
add comment

Have you heard about Message Queueing? You could put a bunch of boxes to handle such load and use message queueing mechanism to save your data to mongodb. But, in this case, your message queue must be able to run concurrent publish subscribe. A free message queue (very good in my opinion) is MassTransit with RabbitMQ.

The workflow would be: 1. Publish your data in message queue; 2. Once its there, launch as many boxes as you want with the subscribers that saves and processes your mongo data.

This approach will be good if you need to scale.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.