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I am trying to scale a PDF which is for example just small of A4 size up to A4.

This works fine with portrait documents. The document is scaled up correctly and then padding is added to the top.

On landscape documents padding is not added though. Therefor the document will end up being the correct height for A4 but then not wide enough, as padding is not added on the document side (as I hoped).

This is what I use to have it working for A4 portrait documents:

gs \
 -sOutputFile=output.pdf \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -sPAPERSIZE=a4 \
 -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
 -dNOPAUSE \
 -dBATCH \
 -dPDFFitPage \
  input.pdf
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4 Answers 4

You should add the -dFIXEDMEDIA switch:

gs \
 -o output.pdf \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -sPAPERSIZE=a4 \
 -dFIXEDMEDIA \
 -dPDFFitPage \
 -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
  input.pdf

-dFIXEDMEDIA is always required if you need to force a specific paper/page/media size and ignore the paper/page/media size specified in the document. Because PDF always has a paper/page/media size defined (PostScript might have, or might not have...).

(My -o ... is shorter and saves one from adding -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE -- but works only for more recent versions of Ghostscript.)

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2  
Thanks, for A5 and one-line: gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -sPAPERSIZE=a5 -dFIXEDMEDIA -dPDFFitPage -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 -o out.pdf in.pdf –  Dorian Feb 26 '14 at 21:51

Your command doesn't do any scaling at all, it just takes a PDF file and converts it into a PDF file.

I'd suggest you try adding -dPDFFitPage which will scale the page in the PDF file to match the current page size (as specified by -sPAPERSIZE in this case).

This is usually intended to work with printers which have a defined paper size, and so may not work well with the pdfwrite device which doesn't have a fixed page size, but its worht a try.

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Thanks for the reply, I have already used the -dPDFFITPAGE argument though and this does not get it working. –  Matt Sep 19 '11 at 8:23
    
There are ways (ugly ones) to scale PDF input, but it usually isn't required. Can you share an example file to look at ? –  KenS Sep 20 '11 at 16:40
    
@Matt: I think it will work if you add the -dFIXEDMEDIA switch... –  Kurt Pfeifle Sep 29 '11 at 12:07
    
I have tried using the -FIXEDMEDIA switch and this didn't help. In the end I have had to append each page of the php to an A4 blank document. This was the only solution I could get in the end –  Matt Oct 4 '11 at 15:34

It seems that the size of the output can be (best) forced by specifying the size in points and not using -dPDFFitPage. I was getting fractional point sizes, which was bad. The following is for A5 printing using a print on demand service. "Real" A5 is 420x595 points. I found that using -sPAPERSIZE=a5 gave fractional point page sizes, but that might have been because the original was wonky.

gs \
 -o output.pdf \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -dDEVICEWIDTHPOINTS=419 -dDEVICEHEIGHTPOINTS=595 \
 -dFIXEDMEDIA \
 -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
  input.pdf

In order to test this, I found that using PDFshuffler I was able to export individual pages, then with pdfinfo I was able to get the precise size of those pages. This confirmed that using device parameters explicitly helped.

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It is a shame that the features of pstops, a very useful package for scaling and combining pages of postscript, doesn't seem to be available for pdfs. There is a program called pdftopdf, but it does (as far as I can see) do the same things as pstops. You can make a ps file (I print to file in evince), use pstops, and then ps2pdf, but that is quite clumsy.

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