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What is the signature required for my webmethod so I can pass 'paramlist' as a parameter?

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function () {
        var slider = $('.slider').slider({
            range: "min",
            min: 0,
            max: 100,
            change: function (e, ui) {
                var set = new Array();

                var values = $('.slider').each(function () {
                    var s = $(this);
                    var data = {
                        Name: s.attr('itemName'),
                        SelectedIndex: s.slider("option","value"),
                        Description: "this is the description",
                        CalculatedValue: 0
                    }

                    set.push(data);    
                });

                CallPageMethod("SliderChanged", set, successful, failure);
            },
            slide: function (e, ui) {
                var point = ui.value;
                $("#selected_value").html(point);
                // var width = 100 - point;
                // $("#range").css({ "width": point + "%" });
            }
        });

        function CallPageMethod(methodName, paramArray, onSuccess, onFail) {
            //get the current location
            var loc = window.location.href;
            loc = (loc.substr(loc.length - 1, 1) == "/") ? loc + "default.aspx" : loc;

            //call the page method
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: loc + "/" + methodName,
                data:  JSON.stringify(paramArray),
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                dataType: "json",
                success: onSuccess,
                fail: onFail
            });
        }

        function successful(response) {
            var lbl = $('#<%= Label1.ClientID %>')
            lbl.html("Your report is now ready for download.");
            alert(response.d);
        }

        function failure(response) {
            alert("An error occurred.");
        }
    });
</script> 

I have tried:

[WebMethod]
public static string SliderChanged(MyModel[] values)
{
    return "success";
}

where

public class MyModel
{
   public string Name {get;set;}
   public string Description {get;set;}
   public int SelectedIndex{get;set;}
   public int CalculatedValue(get;set;}
}

and it fails.

Can you spot my error?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

OK, let's simplify because those string concatenations are simply ugly. It's very easy to achieve this once you replicate the same structure on the server.

So let's suppose that you want to send the following javascript object to the server:

var myObject = { a: { one: 1, two: 2 }, b: [1, 2, 3] };

You would define classes that match this signature:

public class MyModel
{
    public Foo A { get; set; }
    public int[] B { get; set; }
}

public class Foo
{
    public int One { get; set; }
    public int Two { get; set; }
}

and have a webmethod:

[WebMethod]
public string SomeMethod(MyModel model)
{
    ...
}

which you would invoke like this:

var myObject = { a: { one: 1, two: 2 }, b: [1, 2, 3] };
$.ajax({
    url: '/SomeService.asmx/SomeMethod',
    type: 'POST',
    contentType: 'application/json',
    data: JSON.stringify(myObject),
    success: function(result) {
        // Notice the .d property here. That's specific to ASP.NET web methods, 
        // which wrap the response using this property, like this:
        // { d: ... }
        alert(result.d);
    }
});

Notice the JSON.stringify method. It converts a javascript object into a JSON string representation. This method is natively built into modern web browsers but if you need to support legacy browsers you could include json2.js in your page which will test if the browser supports the method natively and use it or if it doesn't provide an alternative implementation.

Another example if if you wanted to send an array of objects, like this:

var myObject = [
    { a: { one: 1, two: 2 }, b: [1, 2, 3] },
    { a: { one: 5, two: 9 }, b: [7, 3, 4] },
    { a: { one: 3, two: 0 }, b: [3, 9, 3] },
]

then your web method will simply look like this:

[WebMethod]
public string SomeMethod(MyModel[] model)
{
    ...
}

Armed with this knowledge you could very easily exchange data structures between javascript and your web methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Darin - it's got me on the right track. Still have issue with the class array that I'm sending to my webmethod. Is what I'm doing above make sense (changed the code following your suggestion)? I'm still getting an error in respect to 'not supported for deserialization of an array.' –  FiveTools Sep 16 '11 at 18:27

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