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I am taking over a c# windows project. In the startup object app(), there is _instance = this;. What does it mean? Is it just for a instance and can be used by other method like shutdown etc? Is this something to force singleton? If yes, how does it force to only have one instance?

_instance is defined as below:

private static App _instance;

Source codes are here:

public partial class App : Application
{
    private static App _instance;

    private SplashView _splashView;

    public App()
    {
        if (!NetworkConnectivityManager.CheckConnectivity())
        {
            Shutdown();
            return;
        }

        try
        {
            try
            {
                AppServiceManager.Start();
            }
            catch
            {
                Retryer.DoWithRetries(delegate()
                {
                    ActivateOtherInstance();
                    Shutdown();
                    return;
                }, 4, 1000);
            }

            ShowSplashScreen();
            ShutdownMode = ShutdownMode.OnExplicitShutdown;
            _instance = this;
            ExceptionManager.SubscribeToUnhandledAppDomainException();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            ExceptionManager.HandleException(ex);
        }
    }

    public static void ShutdownApp()
    {
        _instance.Shutdown();
    }

Please let me know if they are enough to tell. Thanks a lot.

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closed as not a real question by zzzzBov, Ed S., cdeszaq, Tim Cooper, Dori Sep 17 '11 at 8:13

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It depends on how it is used, is _instance static or something? –  Albin Sunnanbo Sep 16 '11 at 18:17
    
please read the faq and post some code. –  zzzzBov Sep 16 '11 at 18:17
1  
Add some more context (code). This is unanswerable. –  Henk Holterman Sep 16 '11 at 18:17
    
Hi Yan, welcome to SO. We cannot provide an answer to your question unless you post more sample code on what you are asking about. You don't have to post the whole thing, just the lines about how _instance is defined, and a summary of lines about where _instance = this is used. –  EtherDragon Sep 16 '11 at 18:27
    
I added source codes. Could you please take a look? –  Yan Sep 16 '11 at 18:40

2 Answers 2

If you ask about how to make a class singleton in C#

class A
{
   private static readonly A _instance = new A();
   public virtual A instance 
   { 
        get
        {
             return _instance;
        }
   }
   private A()
   {
   }
}

That is a typical way to make singleton in C#.

For your code, it depends how to use it. For singleton, it doesn't make any sense.

Ok, I read your code.

It is simply a bad design. It is used for calling shutdown without have the pointer to a instance of the class.

If you happened to new this class somewhere else, calling App.Shutdown won't shutdown all the App.

If you only create one App class, rewrite it with a proper singleton. If you have multiple App instance running at the same time, rewrite it with a proper instance manager.

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Without other logic in the class somewhere, that kind of variable declaration is redundant and unnecessary, since any other method, like shutdown, can reference this just as easily.

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2  
Not always unnecessary. I bet it's a singleton (not that singletons are necessary). –  hunter Sep 16 '11 at 18:19
1  
I didn't say "always". I said "without other logic". –  The Evil Greebo Sep 16 '11 at 18:19
    
Sorry. _instance is defined as private static app: –  Yan Sep 16 '11 at 18:20
    
You mean "without the class definition", which is not logic per say. –  cdeszaq Sep 16 '11 at 18:20
    
No, I meant what I said. Variable declarations are part of the logic of a class. For instance, since we now know that the _instance var is "private static" - that is additional logic, as the variable declaration as private static means something quite different from a variable declaration that is, for instance, just "private". –  The Evil Greebo Sep 16 '11 at 18:23

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