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I am working on a canvas animation, and one of the images is supposed to be a diamond.

Right now, I got as far as this:

ctx[0].beginPath();
ctx[0].moveTo(0,-80);
ctx[0].lineTo(-60,-130);
ctx[0].lineTo(-36,-160);
ctx[0].lineTo(36,-160);
ctx[0].lineTo(60,-130);
ctx[0].closePath();
ctx[0].fillStyle = "rgba(175,175,255,0.7)";
ctx[0].fill();

which draws a plain, light blue translucid diamond shape.

This is far too simple, but I'm having serious problems with the "color". I'm guessing something glass-like should do the trick, but I haven't found anything useful so far. I can add as many lines as needed, if it helps, but the color is my main problem.

This'll be pre-rendered, so long, complex code is not much of a problem. I'd rather not use images, though.

To sum up: I need a glass-ish effect for canvas. Any ideas?

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I'm not sure about the answer but if you look up "diamond vector" on Google Images, you'll see they are mainly filled with a black/white gradient in strokes. This is easily done on canvas, so perhaps it helps. google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=diamond+vector – pimvdb Sep 16 '11 at 18:21
    
thinkvitamin.com/code/how-to-draw-with-html-5-canvas This website has a nice tutorial on how to use gradients. – Ivan Sep 16 '11 at 18:23
    
@Ivan Thanks. I know how to use gradients, but I still needed help on the color choice. – zebasz Sep 16 '11 at 19:25
    
@pimvdb Thanks for the vector idea, hadn't thought of it. I'll check that out. – zebasz Sep 16 '11 at 19:25

I think what you are looking for in glass (or, presumably, diamond) is that it is not entirely transparent or flat. Instead, it reflects its surroundings and very slightly distorts its background. You can give the appearance of a reflection by means of a radial gradient. The distortion, however, is trickier. You could move and scale every pixel behind the object, but that would be incredibly difficult to implement, not to mention grindingly slow. Alternatively, you could implement a very fine, rapidly shifting gradient, which would give the appearance of a distortion of the pixels underneath, even though none is actually taking place.

Here is an implementation of a pane of glass with reflection and distortion.

<html>
<canvas id="canvas" style="position:fixed;">
</canvas>
<script type="text/javascript">
    document.getElementById("canvas").height=window.innerHeight;
    document.getElementById("canvas").width=window.innerWidth;
    ctx=document.getElementById("canvas").getContext("2d");
    textWidth=ctx.measureText("Hello World! ");
    textWidth=Math.ceil(textWidth.width);
    ctx.lineWidth=3;
    targetWidth=Math.floor(window.innerWidth/textWidth)*textWidth;
    for(i=0;i<500;i++)
    {
        ctx.fillText("Hello World! ",((i*textWidth)%(targetWidth)),(16*Math.floor((i+1)*textWidth/window.innerWidth)+16));
    }
    var glass = ctx.createRadialGradient(80,110,0,100,140,100);
    for(i=0;i<=100;i++)
    {
        redComponent=Math.round(210-(i%11));
        greenComponent=Math.round(245-(i%7));
        blueComponent=Math.round(255-(i%5));
        opacity=Math.round(((i%3)+1)*Math.sin(i/200*Math.PI)*1000)/3000;
        glass.addColorStop(i/100,"rgba("+redComponent+","+greenComponent+","+blueComponent+","+opacity+")");
    }
    glass.addColorStop(1,"rgba(0,0,0,0)")
    ctx.fillStyle=glass;
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.translate(100,0);
    ctx.moveTo(100,100);
    ctx.lineTo(187,150);
    ctx.lineTo(137,237);
    ctx.lineTo(50,187);
    ctx.lineTo(100,100);
    ctx.closePath;
    ctx.fill();
    ctx.stroke();
</script>
</html>

And the result is: Image of Result

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