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I am needing to stub the response of a 'current_user' method in an Rspec/capybara request spec. The method is defined in ApplicationController and is using helper_method. The method should simply return a user id. Within the test, I'd like this method to return the same user id each time.

Alternatively, I could fix my problem by setting 'session[:user_id]' in the spec (which is what 'current_user' returns)... but that doesn't seem to work either.

Are either of these possible? Thanks!!!

Edit:

Here is what I've got (it is not working. It just runs the normal current_user method).

require 'spec_helper'

describe "Login" do

   before(:each) do
     ApplicationController.stub(:current_user).and_return(User.first)
   end

  it "logs in" do
    visit '/'
    page.should have_content("Hey there user!")
  end

end

Also not working:

require 'spec_helper'

describe "Login" do

  before(:each) do
    @mock_controller = mock("ApplicationController") 
    @mock_controller.stub(:current_user).and_return(User.first)
  end

  it "logs in" do
    visit '/'
    page.should have_content("Hey there user!")
  end

end
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9  
Is current_user a class method? I guess no. So instead of ApplicationController.stub(:current_user) you may need ApplicationController.any_instance.stub(:current_user). –  skalee Jun 20 '12 at 14:02
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5 Answers

skalee seems to have provided the correct answer in the comment.

If the method you're trying to stub is an instance method (most likely) and not a class method then you need use:

ApplicationController.any_instance.stub(:current_user)

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Here are a couple of examples of the basic form.

controller.stub(:action_name).and_raise([some error])
controller.stub(:action_name).and_return([some value])

In your particular case, I believe the proper form would be:

controller.stub(:current_user).and_return([your user object/id])

Here's a full working example from a project I work on:

describe PortalsController do

  it "if an ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken is raised the user should be redirected to login" do
    controller.stub(:index).and_raise(ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken)
    get :index
    flash[:notice].should eql("Your session has expired.")
    response.should redirect_to(portals_path)
  end

end

To explain my full example, basically what this does is verify that, when an ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken error is raised anywhere in the app, that a flash message appears, and the user is redirected to the portals_controller#index action. You can use these forms to stub out and return specific values, test an instance of a given error being raised, etc. There are several .stub(:action_name).and_[do_something_interesting]() methods available to you.


Update (after you added your code): per my comment, change your code so it reads:

require 'spec_helper'

describe "Login" do

   before(:each) do
      @mock_controller = mock("ApplicationController") 
      @mock_controller.stub(:current_user).and_return(User.first)
   end

  it "logs in" do
    visit '/'
    page.should have_content("Hey there user!")
  end

end
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Thanks for your response, but that looks like a controller spec, as opposed to a request spec. I am pretty new to testing, so I could be wrong :) –  Matt Fordham Sep 16 '11 at 19:02
    
Stub just acts as a replacer for any method defined on any class. In the example you gave, it is a method current_user defined on ApplicationController, correct? The same basic form should work, unless I'm misunderstanding your question. Can you post the best form of the test you've written, even if it's not working? –  jefflunt Sep 16 '11 at 19:05
    
So, I was assuming that your test was inside a spec that starts with describe ApplicationController, so my bad there. If that's not the case, then you should still be able to do ApplicationController.stub(:current_user).and_return([your user object/id]) –  jefflunt Sep 16 '11 at 19:06
    
Or maybe declare a mock object first for the ApplicationController, and then define the stub on that: mock_controller = mock("ApplicationController") followed by mock_controller.stub(:current_user).and_return([your user object/id]) - rspec.info/documentation/mocks –  jefflunt Sep 16 '11 at 19:09
1  
I tried those both (see the code I added above). Still no luck. The original current_user method still gets called. –  Matt Fordham Sep 16 '11 at 19:17
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This works for me and gives me a @current_user variable to use in tests.

I have a helper that looks like this:

def bypass_authentication
  current_user = FactoryGirl.create(:user)

  ApplicationController.send(:alias_method, :old_current_user, :current_user)
  ApplicationController.send(:define_method, :current_user) do 
    current_user
  end
  @current_user = current_user
end

def restore_authentication
  ApplicationController.send(:alias_method, :current_user, :old_current_user)
end

And then in my request specs, I call:

before(:each){bypass_authentication}
after(:each){restore_authentication}
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For anyone else who happens to need to stub an application controller method that sets an ivar (and was stymied by endless wanking about why you shouldn't do that) here's a way that works, with the flavour of Rspec circa October 2013.

before(:each) do
  campaign = Campaign.create!
  ApplicationController.any_instance.stub(:load_campaign_singleton)
  controller.instance_eval{@campaign = campaign}
  @campaign = campaign
end

it stubs the method to do nothing, and sets the ivar on rspec's controller instance, and makes it available to the test as @campaign.

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None of the provided responses worked for me. As in @matt-fordam's original post, I have a request spec, not a controller spec. The test just renders the view without launching a controller.

I resolved this by stubbing the method on the view as described in this other SO post

view.stub(:current_user).and_return(etc)
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