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I have a command that should take less than 1 minute to execute, but for some reason has an extremely long built-in timeout mechanism. I want some bash that does the following:

success = False

try(my_command)

while(!(success))
wait 1 min
if my command not finished
     retry(my_command)
else
     success = True   
end while

How can I do this in BASH?

share|improve this question
    
what do you want to do with the running one? kill it? – Karoly Horvath Sep 16 '11 at 20:07
    
What does retry do? Do you want it to just terminate the earlier attempt and spawn a new one? – carlpett Sep 16 '11 at 20:08
    
@yi_H: SO has a race condition on commenting, it seems... ;) – carlpett Sep 16 '11 at 20:09
    
no, that was a retry grin – Karoly Horvath Sep 16 '11 at 20:27
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Look at the GNU timeout command. This kills the process if it has not completed in a given time; you'd simply wrap a loop around this to wait for the timeout to complete successfully, with delays between retries as appropriate, etc.

while timeout -k 70 60 -- my_command; [ $? = 124 ]
do sleep 2  # Pause before retry
done

If you must do it in pure bash (which is not really feasible - bash uses lots of other commands), then you are in for a world of pain and frustration with signal handlers and all sorts of issues.

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You can run a command and retain control with the & background operator. Run your command in the background, sleep for as long as you wish in the foreground, and then, if the background job hasn't terminated, kill it and start over.

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 while true ; do
     my_command &
     sleep 60
     if [[ $(jobs -r) == "" ]] ; then
         echo "Job is done"
         break
     fi
     # Job took too long
     kill -9 $!
 done
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1  
Don't use kill -9 unless you really have to. partmaps.org/era/unix/award.html#kill – tripleee Sep 17 '11 at 7:10
    
I agree with "Don't use kill -9 unless necessary". Unfortunately, the partmaps.org web site seems to be AWOL now (but the Wayback Machine has it available as web.archive.org/web/20140123014909/http://partmaps.org/era/unix/…). – Jonathan Leffler Jul 4 '14 at 14:51

Adapting @Shin's answer to use kill -0 rather than jobs so that this should work even with classic Bourne shell, and allow for other background jobs. You may have to experiment with kill and wait depending on how my_command responds to those.

while true ; do
    my_command &
    sleep 60
    if kill -0 $! 2>/dev/null; then
        # Job took too long
        kill $!
    else
        echo "Job is done"
        # Reap exit status
        wait $!
        break
    fi
done
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I liked @Jonathan's answer, but tried to make it more straight forward for future use:

until timeout 1 sleep 2
do
    echo "Happening after 1s of sleep"
done
share|improve this answer

retrycli XD

pip install git+git://github.com/sky-shiny/retrycli.git
my_command
retry this !!
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I found an script from: http://fahdshariff.blogspot.com/2014/02/retrying-commands-in-shell-scripts.html

#!/bin/bash

# Retries a command on failure.
# $1 - the max number of attempts
# $2... - the command to run
retry() {
    local -r -i max_attempts="$1"; shift
    local -r cmd="$@"
    local -i attempt_num=1

    until $cmd
    do
        if (( attempt_num == max_attempts ))
        then
            echo "Attempt $attempt_num failed and there are no more attempts left!"
            return 1
        else
            echo "Attempt $attempt_num failed! Trying again in $attempt_num seconds..."
            sleep $(( attempt_num++ ))
        fi
    done
}

# example usage:
retry 5 ls -ltr foo
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