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What are the best practices for writing C or C++ functions that return an int that represents a status code?

Specifically, I want to know about the client usage but other tips are welcome.

For example, can I write something like this:

int foo() {
  return 0;  // because everything was cool
}

And then use it like this?

if (foo()) {
  // what to do if false, e.g. non-zero, e.g. not OK
} else {
  // what to do if true, e.g. zero, e.g. OK
}

This should work because best practices typically dictate that a status code of 0 means everything was OK and also 0 means false in a boolean statement.

However, this wouldn't be good, right:

if (!foo()) {
  // what to do if true
} else {
  // what to do if false
}
share|improve this question
9  
0 does not mean true in a boolean statement. –  Chad Sep 16 '11 at 20:57
1  
You may want to look into exception handling in C++, which was partly designed to eliminate this style of coding. –  templatetypedef Sep 16 '11 at 20:57
    
@Chad: he seems aware of that –  Mooing Duck Sep 16 '11 at 20:58
    
I would say best practice is if ( foo() == 0) { //good state. I've heard you should prefer the most common case to be the first option in an if/else chain. –  Mooing Duck Sep 16 '11 at 21:00
    
0 doesn't mean true in C. It does in sh, though, which is why so many programs return 0 from main to indicate success –  Pillsy Sep 16 '11 at 21:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

We use this in C where I work:

int err = foo();
if (err) {
    // armageddon
}

The assignment and if could be combined, but with more complicated function calls it gets more confusing and some people are confused by assignment in a conditional (and gcc hates it).

For C++, I would prefer exceptions if available, otherwise the above.

Edit: I would recommend returning 0 on success and anything else on error. This is what unix command line utilities do.

share|improve this answer
    
// And armageddon sick of it, too. :-) –  Andy Finkenstadt Sep 16 '11 at 21:00
6  
I would add that the reason it's usually best to return 0 on success and nonzero on error (as opposed to boolean 1/0 meaning true/false) is that there are usually many reasons an operation can fail but only one type of success. –  R.. Sep 16 '11 at 21:52
2  
In and of itself, that doesn't matter. The significance of 0 is that programmers are lazy and this allows the terse if(foo()) to work. Success could just as easily be 42, and we could all write if (foo() != 42) –  Oscar Korz Sep 17 '11 at 2:09

If you really want to use status codes that way, use them with an enum or block of #define statements that describe the intention of the status code.

For example:

enum
{
   kSuccess = 0,
   kFailure = -1,
}

function foo()
{
    return kSuccess;
}

if (kSuccess == foo())
{
    // Handle successful call to foo
}
else
{
    // Handle failed call to foo
}

This way, the intention is clear and there's no error-prone guesswork when someone wants to use or maintain your code in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
What does the "k" mean? –  R.. Sep 16 '11 at 21:49
    
It's just a style thing, used to help constant values stand out from variables and other identifiers. –  adpalumbo Sep 16 '11 at 22:06
    
@adpalumbo: But why do they need to stand out? :) –  GManNickG Sep 16 '11 at 23:11
    
Is it akin to Hungarian notation? Or is "k" an initial for your library/project/company? Or..? –  R.. Sep 16 '11 at 23:41
    
It appears in a lot of places: it's used in Hungarian notation, Apple's naming convention (which is not Hungarian), and many others. The real reason it appears in this sample is simply because it's used in my current employer's style guide, so its second nature for me now. –  adpalumbo Sep 16 '11 at 23:51
if (foo()) {
  // what to do if false
} else {
  // what to do if true
}

The problem with this approach is excess nesting. Suppose you have three functions you want to call:

if(foo1()) {
    if(foo2()) {
        if(foo3()) {
            // the rest of your code
        } else {
            // handle error
        }
    } else {
        // handle error
    }
} else {
    // handle error
}

To solve the excess nesting problem, invert the return value:

if(!foo1()) {
    // handle error
    return;
}

if(!foo2()) {
    // handle error
    return;
}

if(!foo3()) {
    // handle error
    return;
}

This solution suffers from another problem. It mixes the program logic with the error handling code. This complicates everything. Ideally, you want the program logic and error handling separated. This problem can be fixed with the goto

if(!foo1()) 
    goto error1;

if(!foo2())
    goto error2;

if(!foo3())
    goto error3;

return;

error1:
    // handle error
    return;
error2:
    // handle error
    return;
error3:
    // handle error
    return;

Much cleaner.

Also, the goto can solve the problem of resource deallocation. See Using goto for error handling in C by Eli Bendersky for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Wait, but "not"-ing something non-zero does not necessarily make it zero, right? –  Jason Marcell Sep 16 '11 at 21:37
    
"the result is 1 if the operand is 0, and the result is 0 if the operand is not 0." c.comsci.us/etymology/operator/logicalnot.html –  Jay Sep 16 '11 at 21:47
    
Yes, but since there is no first-class Boolean type in C, isn't the ! just an arithmetic negation on the integer operand? It's not a logical negation, right? It just flips the bits. –  Jason Marcell Sep 16 '11 at 21:56
    
so "not"-ins something non-zero does necessarily make it zero –  Jay Sep 16 '11 at 21:56
1  
+1 for mentioning gotos for resource deallocation. It's easy to hate gotos, but they make things much cleaner in this case. Edit: On closer inspection, the example posted doesn't really do the technique justice though. –  Oscar Korz Sep 17 '11 at 8:05

The return statuses should be defined in your interface and known to the caller. Some return 0 on failure (because it's easy to check with !), some return 0 on success (because they have enum of error codes, with OK being the first item).

There's no law or standard, each interface defines its own conventions. In C++ - use exceptions.

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Best practice is to document your code so that yourself and others can quickly look up what the return codes will be when doing error checking.

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Just jumping on board with another option that may be appropriate in your circumstances:

enum fooret { GOOD, BAD, UGLY, WORSE };

fooret foo();  // defined elsewhere

switch(foo())
{
case BAD:
case UGLY:
   // maybe a recoverable failure(s)...
   // take appropriate actions
   break;
case WORSE:
   // maybe non-recoverable
   break;
case GOOD:
   // successful, take appropriate actions
   break;
}
share|improve this answer
int foo() {
   try{
    ...
   return 1
   }
   catch
   {
   return 0;  // because everything was cool
   }
}

I would start by wrapping everything in a try/catch block. Also instead of using and int it might make more scene to return a Boolean value. This is just a little more intuitive when testing in the if statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Swallowing exceptions is bad practice, for lots of reasons: google.com.ar/… –  dario_ramos Sep 16 '11 at 21:03

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