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I've been searching for hours for a solution to this problem. I'm creating a table using prototype.js 1.6.0.1 and am having trouble with the this object in context with the .each function. here is a snippit.

var Table = Class.create({
  initialize : function(id) {
    this.elmnt = $(id);
    this.rows = [];
  },
  initRows : function() {
    $A(this._elmnt.tBodies).each(function(body) {
      $A(body.rows).each(function(row) {
        //right here is where i would like to call
        // this.rows.push(row);
        console.log(this); // prints DOMWindow
      });
    });
  }
});

As you can see inside the second .each function this resolves to DOMWindow. I would like to be able to call this.rows.push(row) but I can't as "this" isn't resolving as expected.

Any help would be appreciated. I know i could do the standard (i=0; i < length; i++) loop but I was trying to make this a little cleaner. Thanks for any guidance you can offer.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason you want to maintain a collection of rows in your Table object? A HTMLTableElement already maintains its own collection. this.elmnt.rows or this.elmnt.tBodies[0].rows. –  user113716 Sep 16 '11 at 22:47
    
    
This is why I don't like each() implementations that override this. And why I love coffee script and it's non scope introducing and non context raping array iteration. –  Alex Wayne Sep 16 '11 at 22:54
    
We are maintaining a collection of rows for easy manipulation. we aren't worried about the size of the collection because it never gets too large, always less than 25 rows and the default is around 10 i belive. I also can't go with coffee script because I can't introduce any new tools into our stack (this is all in a rails 2.3.5 application) –  grizzgreen Sep 17 '11 at 2:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The easiest way to work around this is to save this at the start of initRows and refer to in within the each functions

initRows : function() {
    var self = this;
    $A(this._elmnt.tBodies).each(function(body) {
      $A(body.rows).each(function(row) {
        //right here is where i would like to call
        self.rows.push(row);
        console.log(self); // prints DOMWindow
      });
    });
  }

The problem you're running into is that this can be manipulated by the caller of the function. It's very common in callbacks to set this to an element which is relevant to the call back. In the case of each it's set to the element for the current iteration of the value.

The self trick works because it saves the this as it's bound in the function initRows and then uses that saved value in the iteration.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this helped a lot. That's a good thing to know if I run into this again. Not thrilled about the var self = this but it's a much better solution than the good old fashioned for loop w/ indexes; –  grizzgreen Sep 16 '11 at 22:54
2  
@grizzgreen: If you don't like the variable, use Prototypejs's .bind() method instead. –  user113716 Sep 16 '11 at 22:56
    
+1 for a good explanation of this without confusing it with scope or context. :-) –  RobG Sep 17 '11 at 0:16
initRows : function() {
    $A(this._elmnt.tBodies).each(function(body) {
        $A(body.rows).each((function(e, row) {
            e.rows.push(row);
            console.log(e);
        }).bindAsEventListener(this, row));
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
I disagree with this. The callback for each is not an event so does not need to be bindAsEventListener(), even bind() is overkill since the second parameter of each() is the context. At the point where it is bound row does not exist so it cannot be curried, row only exists inside the callback. Even though you try to bind a context for the callback you don't make an example of using this within it. The parameters for the callback are wrong, it should be (row, index) where index is optional. –  clockworkgeek Sep 18 '11 at 23:30

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