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I'm trying to strip all the lines in an XML file that lie between the tags < KEYS > and < /KEYS >.

As a first pass at the problem I've gotten a regex that will match the first block of keys in the file but it doesn't continue matching the other blocks in the file. I've tried adding "/g" to the regex and I've tried "-0777" to slurp the whole file at once and neither trick makes any difference. Below is the perl one liner:

perl -00 -ne 'print $1 if /(\s+\<KEYS\>\n\s+.*?\n\s+\<\/KEYS\>)/s' someFile.xml

and I get this output:

  <KEYS>
    <KEY name="cone_id" type="long" nativeType="number(17)"/>
    <KEY name="bar_id" type="long" nativeType="number(32)"/>
    <KEY name="foo_type" type="int" nativeType="number(3)"/>
  </KEYS>

As stated above there are a lot more blocks in the file (which is nearly five thousand lines long) but the perl code isn't messing with any of the rest.

Any suggestions?

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use XML::Parser; –  Fredrik Pihl Sep 16 '11 at 22:57
1  
Yeah, I figured someone would suggest that, but I don't care about the xml structure at all. I'm just stripping out blocks of texts that just happen to be xml. I would run into the same problem if this was plain old English and the tags were just words. The issue is throwing another loop around the whole thing so it just repeats the regex as it progresses through the file. –  phileas fogg Sep 16 '11 at 23:12
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your one-liner will do what you want by making two changes:

  1. Change if to while.
  2. Add the g option to your regex: /.../gs

Alternatively, it looks like the start and end tags of interest are on different lines, by themselves. If so, the flip-flop operator could be handy:

perl -ne 'print if m{<KEYS>} .. m{</KEYS>}' DATA_FILE
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Thanks, that did the trick. And that's for the tip on the flip-flop operator –  phileas fogg Sep 20 '11 at 23:04
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I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "stripping all the lines". If you want to print all the KEYS elements and no others, then here you go:

perl -MXML::Simple -e 'print XMLout((XMLin(join "", <>))->{KEYS})' data.xml    

or:

use XML::Simple;
my $xml = XMLin(join '', <DATA>); 
print XMLout($xml->{KEYS});

__DATA__
<root>
  <KEYS>
    <KEY name="cone_id" type="long" nativeType="number(17)"/>
    <KEY name="bar_id" type="long" nativeType="number(32)"/>
    <KEY name="foo_type" type="int" nativeType="number(3)"/>
  </KEYS>
  <NOTKEYS1>
    <KEY name="cone_id" type="long" nativeType="number(17)"/>
    <KEY name="bar_id" type="long" nativeType="number(32)"/>
    <KEY name="foo_type" type="int" nativeType="number(3)"/>
  </NOTKEYS1>
  <NOTKEYS2>
    <KEY name="cone_id" type="long" nativeType="number(17)"/>
    <KEY name="bar_id" type="long" nativeType="number(32)"/>
    <KEY name="foo_type" type="int" nativeType="number(3)"/>
  </NOTKEYS2>
  <KEYS>
    <KEY name="cone_id" type="long" nativeType="number(17)"/>
    <KEY name="bar_id" type="long" nativeType="number(32)"/>
    <KEY name="foo_type" type="int" nativeType="number(3)"/>
  </KEYS>
</root>

Even if you don't care about the structure at all, this is a bit easier to reason about than regexes, no?

In any case, here's a regex version:

perl -e '$a = join "", <>; print $a =~ m/(\s+\<KEYS\>\n\s+.*?\n\s+\<\/KEYS\>)/sg' data.xml
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yup, that's what I mean, sorry I wasn't clearer –  phileas fogg Sep 20 '11 at 22:33
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If the XML is well-formed, you can use either xml_grep, which comes with XML::Twig, or xml_grep2, in App::xml_grep2:

xml_grep -v KEYS to_strip.xml
xml_grep2 -v '//KEYS' to_strip.xml

The first one is based on XML::Twig and works in stream mode, the second one is based on XML::LibXML and loads the whole document in memory before starting to grep, but it should be faster (I haven't benchmarked it though).

Neither of those is a Perl one liner, but they are both written in Perl, so I hope that's acceptable for you ;--)

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Although not exactly what I had in mind I do appreciate the links to XML::Twig and App::sml_grep2. They look quite handy. –  phileas fogg Sep 20 '11 at 23:05
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Do you have to use perl? If not, try sed:

sed -i".backup" 's/<KEYS>([^<]*)<\/KEYS>/\1/g' somefile.xml
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perl -MXML::LibXML -e'
   my $doc = XML::LibXML->new->parse_file($ARGV[0]);
   $_->parentNode->removeChild($_)
      for $doc->documentElement->findnodes("//KEYS");
   $doc->toFile($ARGV[1], 0);
' infile outfile

I added line breaks for readability. You may remove them if you really a true one liner, although it works with the line breaks too.

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