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The query is this one:

SELECT FriendID FROM Relationships WHERE UserID = 1
INTERSECT
   (SELECT FriendID FROM Relationships WHERE UserID = 2
    UNION SELECT UserID FROM Relationships WHERE FriendID = 2)

(for the curious readers, please note that the friend relationship is not necessarily symmetrical in this scenario)

I've tried all the possible combination of parentheses with no luck.

If I omit the parentheses, there's no operator precedence in the sense that it reads it like 5+6*3 = 33, so if I put the union before the intersection, the query works fine. But what will I do when I will have to intersect two unions?

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1  
I believe the answer is here: old.nabble.com/…. –  Larry Lustig Sep 16 '11 at 23:15
    
Thanks Larry, I found a solution starting from your link –  gd1 Sep 20 '11 at 7:52

2 Answers 2

You can use temporary tables in such case.

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Thanks for the suggestion, but I think in this case would just make the query less readable, even if under the hood it may work the same (temporary tables). Look at my own answer for the solution. –  gd1 Sep 20 '11 at 7:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to Larry Lustig (which pointed me this), I rewrote my query as follows

SELECT FriendID FROM Relationships WHERE UserID = 1
INTERSECT SELECT ID FROM
   (SELECT FriendID AS ID FROM Relationships WHERE UserID = 2
    UNION SELECT UserID AS ID FROM Relationships WHERE FriendID = 2)

And it works.

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