Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Implementing Equals() for reference types is harder than it seems. My current canonical implementation goes like this:

public bool Equals( MyClass obj )
{
  // If both refer to the same reference they are equal.
  if( ReferenceEquals( obj, this ) )
    return true;

  // If the other object is null they are not equal because in C# this cannot be null.
  if( ReferenceEquals( obj, null ) )
   return false;

   // Compare data to evaluate equality    
   return _data.Equals( obj._data );
}

public override bool Equals( object obj )
{
  // If both refer to the same reference they are equal.
  if( ReferenceEquals( obj, this ) )
    return true;

  // If the other object is null or is of a different types the objects are not equal. 
  if( ReferenceEquals( obj, null ) || obj.GetType() != GetType() )
    return false;

  // Use type-safe equality comparison
  return Equals( (MyClass)obj );
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
  // Use data's hash code as our hashcode  
  return _data.GetHashCode();
}

I think that this covers all corner (inheritance and such) cases but I may be wrong. What do you guys think?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I wrote a fairly comprehensive guide to this a while back. For a start your equals implementations should be shared (i.e. the overload taking an object should pass through to the one taking a strongly typed object). Additionally you need to consider things such as your object should be immutable because of the need to override GetHashCode. More info here:

http://gregbeech.com/blog/implementing-object-equality-in-dotnet

share|improve this answer
    
My implementation is "shared". As you can see, at the end of Equals(Object) there is a call to Equals(MyClass). I am aware of the mutability and GetHashCode() issues; but it is a an important observation. It has bit me several times. Too bad that there's no "easy" way to declare read only "classes". –  Eddie Velasquez Sep 18 '08 at 18:35
    
Link is broken for now. –  Restuta Feb 15 '12 at 7:52
add comment

Better hope that this._data is not null if it's also a reference type.

public bool Equals( MyClass obj )
{
    if (obj == null) {
    	return false;
    }
    else {
    	return (this._data != null && this._data.Equals( obj._data ))
                         || obj._data == null;
    }
}

public override bool Equals( object obj )
{
    if (obj == null || !(obj is MyClass)) {
    	return false;
    }
    else {
    	return this.Equals( (MyClass)obj );
    }
}

public override int GetHashCode() {
    return this._data == null ? 0 : this._data.GetHashCode();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right. This is just a "canonical" implementation to prove the concepts behind "Equals". My "real" implementation usually is implemented using Equals(a,b) instead of a.Equals(b). –  Eddie Velasquez Sep 16 '08 at 19:15
add comment

Concerning inheritance, I think you should just let the OO paradigm does its magic.

Specifically, the GetType() check should be removed, it might break polymorphism down the line.

share|improve this answer
1  
I disagree. Imagine that we have Apple and Orange classes which derive from the Fruit class. If we remove the GetType() check in the implementation of Equals in Fruit, we could compare Apples to Oranges unless every derived class properly overrides Equals() too. It could get messy very quickly. –  Eddie Velasquez Sep 16 '08 at 19:12
add comment

I agree with chakrit, objects of different types should be allowed to be semantically equal if they have the same data or ID.

Personally, I use the following:

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        var other = obj as MyClass;
        if (other == null) return false;

        return this.data.Equals(other.data);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I disagree with you. This would allow us to compare Apples to Oranges. –  Eddie Velasquez Sep 16 '08 at 19:16
    
The point is that maybe you do want them to be equal. The GetType check won't allow the use of proxies, for example; you'll have 2 identical objects, one wrapped inside a container of a different type, but you want to identify them as the same. –  Santiago Palladino Sep 23 '08 at 13:17
    
@SantiagoPalladino: It often makes sense to define equality comparers which use a looser definition of equivalence than Object.Equals. For example, .net defines various case-insensitive string comparers that would regard "HELLO" as equivalent to "Hello" or "heLlO", even though the strings are different. Such comparers could accept as equal objects as different types. I very much dislike the notion of objects overriding Object.Equals to define an equivalence relation that is so loose as to allow objects of different types to compare unequal, unless one explicitly provides for... –  supercat Sep 24 '12 at 22:30
    
...the possibility that calling X.Equals(Y) may require X to call Y.Equals(X) if Y is an instance of a more-derived type than X. Otherwise, if a proxy knows how to compare itself to an object, but an object doesn't know how to compare itself with the proxy, the Equals method would not define a proper recurrence relation (which, by definition, should be reflexive). –  supercat Sep 24 '12 at 22:33
add comment

It depends on whether you're writing a value type or a reference type. For a sortable value type, I recommend this: A code snippet for Visual Studio 2005 that implements a skeleton value type adhering to Framework Design Guidelines

share|improve this answer
    
I know that the implementation for value types is different. I did ask about reference types. –  Eddie Velasquez Sep 16 '08 at 19:04
    
Broken link. :| –  Restuta Feb 15 '12 at 7:53
    
I've fixed the broken link... –  Peter Ritchie Feb 22 '12 at 22:39
    
-1 as pointed out the original question was specific to reference types, so this answer doesn't add anything. –  cori Apr 23 '12 at 15:28
    
@cori if you compare writing a reference Equals to a value Equals and you've turned out that you've written a value equals on a reference then it might be wrong. So, in that respect, there is some value. –  Peter Ritchie Apr 25 '12 at 19:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.