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I'm trying to have python recall the 'enstring' variable I set using the 'crypto' method I created so I can use it in the 'decrypto' method.

class encryptString():
    def crypto(self, string):
        enstring = base64.b64encode(string)
        print enstring
    def decrypto(self, enstring):
        destring = base64.b64decode(enstring)
        print destring

So, I want 'crypto' to set 'enstring' as the variable for the encoded string. However, when I call the variable after using the 'crypto' method, I get the "enstring is not defined" error. How can I fix this?

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Also: -posted from my iPhone if code looks weird. :-/ –  jjJ Sep 16 '11 at 23:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use self.enstring both times. Do the same for destring. Don't pass enstring to decrypto as it'll be part of self.

class encryptString():
    def crypto(self, string):
        self.enstring = base64.b64encode(string)
        print self.enstring
    def decrypto(self):
        self.destring = base64.b64decode(self.enstring)
        print self.destring

This way, enstring and destring are instance attributes, so they're not lost when the crypto and decrypto methods return.

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If you want the class to save enstring as a member, then you must assign it to self.enstring:

class encryptString():

    def __init__(self):
        self.enstring = ''
        self.destring = ''

    def crypto(self, string):
        self.enstring = base64.b64encode(string)
        print self.enstring

    def decrypto(self):
        self.destring = base64.b64decode(self.enstring)
        print self.destring

(Avoid using string as a variable name.)

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If you initialize them there is no way to tell between "I haven't encrypted yet" and "crypto was passed an empty string". string is just another module in the standard library, not a built-in, so I think it's fine to use it as a variable name (true, it's not very descriptive, but it's a short method and there is only one thing for it to mean in context). –  agf Sep 17 '11 at 0:15

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