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I was trying to do something like:


public class MyClass <A, B, C <A, B> > {
  ...
}

But Eclipse highlights "B," and says "unexpected , expected extends". What gives? Are nested generics not allowed?

share|improve this question
    
It's allowed. Show your actual classes if you want... –  david van brink Sep 17 '11 at 0:43
    
@Doug: Given your responses to the answers below, I suspect some deeper confusion is at work here. Perhaps you could post some more sample code, showing how you expect clients of MyClass should be able to use it, and that might make your question clearer. –  Daniel Pryden Sep 17 '11 at 1:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's because you haven't defined C as a type that is itself typed with 2 type parameters.
Try something like this:

public class MyClass <A, B, C extends Map<A, B>> {
    // This compiles
}
share|improve this answer
    
But what if C can be one of several classes that do not have a common parent class? –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 0:51
3  
@Doug: If there is no common supertype to C, then how do you know it needs to be parameterized? If you just mean literally having the same parent class, then that's not actually necessary if the extends constraint is on an interface, since Java supports multiple interface inheritance. –  Daniel Pryden Sep 17 '11 at 1:08
    
@Daniel, right, I think that's the answer here is I should be using an interface in that third template slot. And if I'm trying to use built in Java classes with it, then I need to use an interface that they implement and that my classes also implement. If that's not good enough, doesn't cover all the functionality I need, then the built in classes can't provide it either, so it is inappropriate to use both. I think that's the answer to the situation. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 8:20
    
I'm accepting this answer, but really it's because of the combination of this answer and Daniel's comments. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 8:20

You don't have to declare nested types like that. Simply

class MyClass<A, B, C> {}

And when you create a MyClass, you could do something like

MyClass<List<String>, Set<Date>, Map<Integer, Long>> instance;
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this, but then the compiler complained when I tried to instantiate C's with something like C<A, B> = new C<A, B>(); –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 0:52
2  
@Doug: C is a type parameter. It's not instantiable. Maybe if you take a step back and explain more broadly what problem you're trying to solve, someone can point out a better path to a solution. –  Ryan Stewart Sep 17 '11 at 0:53
    
So my real problem is that in general type parameters are not instantiable. What about a child class that uses C as a template parameter? Is that permitted? –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 0:55
1  
This will compile but it misses any relationship between C and A, B... –  user166390 Sep 17 '11 at 1:43

If your template parameters don't share share a class hierarchy, you can use an interface.

For example:

interface IConverter<TFrom, TTo>
{
    TTo convert(TFrom from);
}

class IntToStringConverter implements IConverter<Integer, String>
{
    public String convert(Integer from)
    {
        return "This is a string: " + from.toString();
    }
}

class ConverterUser<TConverter extends IConverter<TFrom, TTo>, TFrom, TTo>
{
    public ConverterUser()
    {
    }

    private List<TConverter> _converter2;

    private TConverter _converter;

    public void replaceConverter(TConverter converter)
    {
        _converter = converter;
    }

    public TTo convert(TFrom from)
    {
        return _converter.convert(from);
    }
}

class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        ConverterUser<IntToStringConverter, Integer, String> converterUser =
            new ConverterUser<IntToStringConverter, Integer, String>();

        converterUser.replaceConverter(new IntToStringConverter());

        System.out.println(converterUser.convert(328));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot about the "extends" capability in templates, so maybe this type of thing could also work. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 1:19
    
Dan, I liked this answer, but I think the best answer would be a combination of this one and the currently accepted one. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 8:22
    
:) Yup, that one's good too. –  Dan Cecile Sep 17 '11 at 13:39

This is not possible in Java. See the Type Variables section of the language definition along with Generic Classes and Type Parameters. I recently saw (somewhere) a mention that Java is incapable of this but Scala can do it. This is confirmed by S4.4 of the Scala Language Specification.

This is also somewhat confirmed by the following code compiling successfully.

class MyClass [A, B, C [A, B]] {
}

Compiling in java yielded the follwing answers.

MyClass.java:1: > expected
class MyClass <A, B, C<A, B>> {
                      ^
MyClass.java:1: <identifier> expected
class MyClass <A, B, C<A, B>> {
                        ^
MyClass.java:1: ';' expected
class MyClass <A, B, C<A, B>> {
                           ^
MyClass.java:2: reached end of file while parsing
}
 ^
4 errors

I would guess that there is an easier solution to your problem however, as this is somewhat unusual.

share|improve this answer
    
There was a solution, but I was still interested in knowing whether it was possible at all for the sake of curiosity or future designs where it might have been a FAR better solution. In this case it wasn't a really big deal, although it still would have made things smoother. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 8:18
    
Until I saw this answer, I was puzzling over why such syntax would not be allowed. Thanks for bringing up Scala. –  gkb0986 Sep 2 '13 at 18:07

I am guessing you want MyClass to be a generic class with type parameters A, B, and C. Furthermore you want C to be a generic class with type parameters A and B.

So that I could write

  1. MyClass < String , Date , Map < String , Date > >
  2. MyClass < String , Date , Hashtable < String , Date > > but not
  3. MyClass < String , Date , ElementVsitor < Date , String > >

Then I don't think you can do that.

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That's exactly what I want. Hmm, I suspected that might be the case, and it's unfortunate because it will lead to a lot of code duplication. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 0:53
    
Actually I am struggling to think of a use case. So what code would be duplicated? –  emory Sep 17 '11 at 0:57
    
Well, I'm working on something that has the same interface as map, and is sometimes used with map as a child class, but can also be used with a user defined class as a child class in which case functionality is extended by giving new meaning to get, put, etc. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 1:03
    
@Doug: Map is not a class, it's an interface. (At least not if you mean java.util.Map.) The whole point of using interfaces is that they define the set of valid operations on a type. If your generic types don't share a common interface, then how is your code supposed to manipulate them? –  Daniel Pryden Sep 17 '11 at 1:11
    
@Daniel, right, I think that's the answer here is I should be using an interface in that third template slot. And if I'm trying to use built in Java classes with it, then I need to use an interface that they implement and that my classes also implement. If that's not good enough, doesn't cover all the functionality I need, then the built in classes can't provide it either, so it is inappropriate to use both. I think that's the answer to the situation. –  Douglas Treadwell Sep 17 '11 at 1:18

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