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Consider :

Grid@Partition[
     Text[Style[ToString[Range[0, 180, 22.5][[#]]] <> "\[Degree]", Bold, 16,
          GrayLevel[(8 - #)/10]]] & /@ Range[8], 2, 1]

enter image description here

How can I get rid of the dot following the Integers ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If a number becomes an integer when you rationalize it, use the integer; otherwise stick with the original number. This is achieved by a simple function, f[x]:

f[x_] := If[IntegerQ[n = Rationalize[x]], n, x]

Testing...

f[67.5]
f[0.]
f[45.]

(* Out  *)
67.5
0
45

You can't just Rationalize all the values, as the following makes clear:

rationalize

To see how it works in your case, just insert (f/@) into your code to reformat the values output from Range:

Grid@Partition[
Text[Style[
  ToString[(f/@ Range[0, 180, 22.5])[[#]]] <> "\[Degree]", 
  Bold, 16, GrayLevel[(8 - #)/10]]] & /@ Range[8], 2, 1]

So

temps

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Thank You, combining with sodas I think N@Rationalize@ any number should do it ? –  500 Sep 17 '11 at 1:46
4  
@500 N@Rationalize@<any number> does not quite solve it, because N undoes the results by converting the integer (returned by Rationalize) back to a real number! E.g. N[Rationalize[45.]] returns "45." as the result. –  David Carraher Sep 17 '11 at 1:57
    
Than you David ! –  500 Sep 17 '11 at 2:59
    
re: edit, good catch ;-) I didn't notice it when I voted for this a few minutes ago. –  Mr.Wizard Oct 19 '11 at 1:53
    
@Mr.Wizard I learned that one from you just a few days ago. –  David Carraher Oct 19 '11 at 10:56

Although the original question doesn't have any numbers with exponents, it would be safest in general to use NumberForm as follows:

trimPoint[n_] := 
NumberForm[n, 
 NumberFormat -> (DisplayForm@
  RowBox[Join[{StringTrim[#1, RegularExpression["\\.$"]]}, 
    If[#3 != "", {
      "\[Times]", SuperscriptBox[#2, #3]}, {}]]
   ] &)]

Then you only have to modify the original code by inserting //trimPoint as follows:

Grid@Partition[
 Text[Style[
  ToString[Range[0, 180, 22.5][[#]] // trimPoint] <> "\[Degree]", 
  Bold, 16, GrayLevel[(8 - #)/10]]] & /@ Range[8], 2, 1]
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In general, you should use Rationalize.

Rationalize@10.
Out[1] = 10

However in your case, you shouldn't simply use Rationalize, as you don't want to operate on some of the elements. Here's a simple approach that will do what you want.

list = Range[0, 180, 22.5] /. (x_ /; FractionalPart@x == 0.) -> 
   IntegerPart@x
Grid@Partition[
  Text[Style[ToString[list[[#]]] <> "\[Degree]", Bold, 16, 
      GrayLevel[(8 - #)/10]]] & /@ Range[8], 2, 1]

enter image description here

The code above generates the same list as yours, and then conditionally replaces those elements which have a FractionalPart equal to 0. (e.g., 10.), with its IntegerPart (e.g. 10).

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@500 See my edit above –  r.m. Sep 17 '11 at 2:01
    
Thank you Yoda ! –  500 Sep 17 '11 at 2:59
1  
There can be problems with this approach, e.g. AccountingForm[ 1500000*0.675 /. (x_ /; FractionalPart@x == 0.) -> IntegerPart@x] –  Chris Degnen Sep 17 '11 at 11:08
    
@ChrisDegnen You're right. I didn't think through cases where it'd fail, and only tested the OP's case. Thanks for pointing it out :) –  r.m. Sep 17 '11 at 18:32
2  
You're welcome. Binary representation means care needs to be taken using IntegerPart and FractionalPart, e.g. x = 6250*0.292; {x, IntegerPart[x], IntegerPart[Round[x, 10.^-6]]} yields {1825., 1824, 1825} –  Chris Degnen Sep 17 '11 at 18:36

Another possibility is not to generate them in the first place.

If[IntegerQ[#], #, N@#] & /@ Range[0, 180, 45/2]

giving

{0, 22.5, 45, 67.5, 90, 112.5, 135, 157.5, 180}

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Another option is to remove any trailing "." using StringTrim:

Grid@Partition[
  Text[Style[
      StringTrim[ToString[Range[0, 180, 22.5][[#]]], "."] <> "\[Degree]", 
    Bold, 16, GrayLevel[(8 - #)/10]]] & /@ Range[8], 2, 1]
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