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Consider the following abstract class:

class Abstract {
public:
    // ...

    virtual bool operator==(const Abstract& rhs) const = 0;

    // ...
};

Now suppose I'm creating multiple derived classes from this abstract class. However, each one uses a different algorithm when comparing with its own type, and a generic algorithm when comparing with any of the other derived classes. Between the following two options, which would be the better, more efficient option?

Option A:

class Derived : public Abstract {
public:
    // ...

    bool operator==(const Abstract& rhs) const {
        // Code for comparing to any of the other derived classes
    }

    bool operator==(const Derived& rhs) const {
        // Code for comparing to myself
    }

    // ...
};

Option B:

class Derived : public Abstract {
public:
    // ...

    bool operator==(const Abstract& rhs) const {
        const Derived* tmp = dynamic_cast<const Derived*>(&rhs);
        if (tmp) {
            // Code for comparing to myself
        }
        else {
            // Code for comparing to any of the other derived class
        }
    }
};

I'm really curious as to what advantages and disadvantages these options would have, as C++ typecasting is a relatively mysterious topic to me. Furthermore, which solution is more "standard", and does the second solution have any impacts on performance?

Is there possibly a third solution? Especially if there were many derived classes, each needing its own special comparison algorithm against different derived classes?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that option B is what you are looking for if you're expecting the == operator to use the dynamic type of the argument. For example:

class base
{
public:
  virtual bool operator ==( const base& other ) = 0;
};

class derived : public base
{
public:
  bool operator ==( const base& other ) { return false; }
  bool operator ==( const derived& other ) { return true; }
};


int main()
{
  base* a = new derived;
  base* b = new derived;
  std::cout << ( *a == *b ) << std::endl;
}

This prints:

0

So operator ==( const base& other ) gets called, even if the actual dynamic type is derived.

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I see. This example is the sort of thing I was after. Though I believe Option A would be more suitable to my particular need, because I want to have the ability to control which algorithm to use, even though the object may not be the correct type, and this example shows exactly how I can do that. Thank you! –  Zeenobit Sep 17 '11 at 3:13

Your two methods are for different situation. For option A, the static type of rhs is used to decide which function to call, and for option B the dynamic type is used.

So if you want your program to choose its behavior base on the "real" type of the argument, I think you should choose the second option. If types can be known at compile time, option A should be used since it gives better performance.

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So dynamic_cast actually has a relatively higher performance cost? –  Zeenobit Sep 17 '11 at 3:14
    
@teedayf, relatively higher is an understatement. Ok, more seriously, as long as you aren't using dynamic_cast in something that is performance critical you should have nothing to worry about. –  Marlon Sep 17 '11 at 5:33

You actually can do it third way using one of the techiniques to implement double dispatching. This approach is fully described in Item 31 of "More Effective C++". Here is small example:

#include <iostream>

class Derived1;
class Derived2;

class Base
{
public:
    virtual bool operator==( Base& other) = 0;
    virtual bool compare( Base& other) {return false;}
    virtual bool compare( Derived1& other) {return false;}
    virtual bool compare( Derived2& other) {return false;}
};

class Derived1 : public Base
{
public:
    virtual bool operator==( Base& other) {return other.compare(*this);}

    virtual bool compare( Base& other) {return false;}
    virtual bool compare( Derived1& other) {return true;}
};

class Derived2 : public Base
{
public:
    virtual bool operator==( Base& other) {return other.compare(*this);}

    virtual bool compare( Base& other) {return false;}
    virtual bool compare( Derived2& other) {return true;}
};

int main()
{
    Base *a = new Derived1;
    Base *b = new Derived1;
    Base *c = new Derived2;

    std::cout << (*a == *b) << std::endl;
    std::cout << (*a == *c) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

1
0
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Unfortunately C++ have no multimethods that would choose the current function to call based on dynamic type information. You need double dispatch, visitor pattern or some other trick to implement the behavior.

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