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I read from MySQL Performance Blog that depending on the selectivity of a query, a full table scan can be faster than an index scan. Bearing such knowledge in mind, I experimented with a query having 12 WHERE criteria and one HAVING criterion on a table with 5 Million rows as per my previous post. I observed that the full table scan is still much faster (7.7sec) than an index scan with a four-column index (160sec) that has 3% selectivity (161341/5000000).

My question is: "Why is an index scan having 3% selectivity still 20 times slower than a full table scan? Is there a way to make the index scan faster?"

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For the above comparison, I did a echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches to flush system cache before the queries were run. Subsequent queries are always faster with index scan if I do not flush the cache. Flush tables command does not affect query speed here. –  Question Overflow Sep 17 '11 at 9:28
    
In a comment to your previous post say that the execution times above are measured on the first execution of the SQL. Is the performance difference the same if you ecxcute them more than one time? –  Klas Lindbäck Sep 21 '11 at 12:11
    
@ Klas Lindbäck: If I do a flush (see my first comment) every time before each query, the index scan is always much slower than a full scan. –  Question Overflow Sep 21 '11 at 13:04
    
The problem seems to be related with how the table is loaded into teh cache. When you do a full table scan the table with be read using a sequential read. My guess is that when you use the index, the blocks will be read in the order they appear in the index, i.e. non-sequential. But that depends on your storage solution. –  Klas Lindbäck Sep 22 '11 at 7:15

1 Answer 1

an index scan with a four-column index

The order of the columns in the index makes a difference to the performance. Put the most selective column first in the index. And it also depends on your query. A WHERE clause with 'x LIKE '%foo%' will notuse the index effectively, but 'x LIKE 'foo%' will be more effective.

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It was mentioned in another posting that the order does not make a difference if the query uses all columns of the index. –  Question Overflow Sep 17 '11 at 5:10
    
You may like to check out my query here. The index used is (act, Type, tn, flA). –  Question Overflow Sep 17 '11 at 5:16
    
It is hard to judge which is the most selective column given that one query can be selective on column A and another query can be selective on column B, and so on. –  Question Overflow Sep 17 '11 at 5:20
    
@Ben: Then you can add multiple indexes and let the optimizer choose the best one for each query. Note that indexes are not free: It costs extra disk space and insert/update time will be slower. –  Mark Byers Sep 17 '11 at 5:21
    
Ok, I will test it out by reversing the column sequence in the index. But from application point of view, it is hard to judge which is the most selective column given that one query can be selective on column A and another query can be selective on column B, and so on. –  Question Overflow Sep 17 '11 at 5:22

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