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Does Python ctypes have a known memory leak? I am working on a Python script having code like the below snippet, using ctypes, that for some reason is causing a memory leak. The "while True" in this example is to test for the leak caused by calling the function. It is being run on Windows with Python 2.5.4:

import ctypes
def hi():
    class c1(ctypes.Structure):
            _fields_=[('f1',ctypes.c_uint8)]
    class c2(ctypes.Structure):
            _fields_=[('g1',c1*2)]

while True:
    test=hi()

The leak can be tested using ProcessExplorer -- as it keeps looping, Python keeps taking up more and more memory. It seems to require having two Structure subclasses where one of the classes has a "multiple" of the other one (using the * operator), but I'm not sure if the condition is more basic than that. Even if del test is added in the loop, it still leaks memory.

Any ideas on what might be causing this?

Edit: Because someone suggested it might not have garbage-collected yet, here is an edited version that does garbage-collect but still appears to leak memory:

import gc
import ctypes
def hi():
    class c1(ctypes.Structure):
            _fields_=[('f1',ctypes.c_uint8)]
    class c2(ctypes.Structure):
            _fields_=[('g1',c1*2)]

while True:
    test=hi()
    test2=gc.collect()
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How much does it leak? It it one byte for each c1 created? Have a counter that's printed every 50,000 calls to hi() or so so you know. –  agf Sep 17 '11 at 5:40
    
In ProcessExplorer, the "Working Set" memory steadily increases by about 20-30 KB every second, and every so often the "Private Bytes" catches up to that. After about 12 minutes I'm already over 59 MB of memory and counting for the second snippet running in an interpreter. How do I put a counter within the code that tells you how much memory is being taken up? Can anyone else corroborate me on this? –  user553702 Sep 17 '11 at 5:48
    
The easiest way would be to add from itertools import count at the top then change while True: to for c in count(): and then add if not c % 50000: print c in the loop. Then, if the prints are too frequent or too infrequent to be useful, increase or decrease that 50000. –  agf Sep 17 '11 at 5:57
    
I've added a bug-tracker case; here is the cross-reference: bugs.python.org/issue12998 –  user553702 Sep 17 '11 at 6:47
    
As you can see from the replies to that case, it's not a leak. You really should not attempt to use process explorer as a leak detection tool. –  David Heffernan Sep 17 '11 at 8:09
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2 Answers

That's not a memory leak, that just means the garbage collector hasn't run yet. And even if the garbage collector does run, odds are good that there's some kind of memory pooling going on.

ProcessExplorer isn't a good debugging tool, especially for memory.

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Even if I add "import gc" at the beginning and "test2=gc.collect()" inside the loop, the memory it takes up still keeps growing. What do you mean by "memory pooling"? Shouldn't the memory get freed at some point? –  user553702 Sep 17 '11 at 5:31
    
A memory pool means that an area is set aside (within python) which holds free memory. It's an optimization technique. It only looks like the memory is being used. –  Chris Sep 17 '11 at 14:57
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The script in and by itself doesn't leak. Running with gc.set_debug(gc.DEBUG_LEAK) shows that the created structure types are collectable, and gc.garbage remains empty in every loop iterations, so there are not uncollectable objects. Running the script with time on a Linux system doesn't show an steady increase in memory consumption, too.

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