Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been stuck on a regex. I want to append foo=1 to all URLs.

For a URL like:

www.xyz.com/
Rewrite:
www.xyz.com/?foo=1

For a URL like:

www.xyz.com/?abc=2
Rewrite:
www.xyz.com/?abc=2&foo=1
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The one below is for your first url

([w]{3}\.[a-zA-Z0-9\-]+\.([a-zA-Z0-9]{3,4}|[a-zA-Z]{2}|[a-zA-Z0-9]{3,4}\.[a-zA-Z]{2}))/?

This is for the second url

([w]{3}\.[a-zA-Z0-9\-]+\.([a-zA-Z0-9]{3,4}|[a-zA-Z]{2}|[a-zA-Z0-9]{3,4}\.[a-zA-Z]{2}))/?(\?\S*=\S*)
share|improve this answer

In Nginx this is not achieved by rewrite, as it operates only on the path portion of the URI. Instead you have to modify the $args variable:

set $args $args&foo=1
share|improve this answer

try putting your variable before the args,

location /whatever {
    try_files $uri /index.php?foo=1&$args;
}

This way if args are empty you'll have foo, if not it will be appended. Putting $args first might make your request end up looking like this

www.xyz.com/?&foo=1

because $args were first and they were empty, and I'm not sure if that will be handled correctly or not.

Mind also that if you explicitly define foo the value you entered will be overwritten by nginx.

www.xyz.com/?foo=new_value&foo=1

foo=1 will overwrite the new value, if you want to protect that value putting $args at the end will help you do that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.