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I am trying to open a file in C++ but it seems to be giving me a bit of hassle, here is the code that deals with opening the file so far:

void CreateHistogram(string str_file, vector<HistogramWord> &result) {
    string line;
    long location;
    HistogramWord newWord;
    const char * filename = str_file.c_str();

    //ifstream myfile (str_file.c_str());
    ifstream myfile (filename);
    //myfile.open(filename);
    if (myfile.is_open()) {
        while (myfile.good()) {
            getline(myfile, line);
            line = clarifyWord(line);

Okay, just for a bit of explanation, HistogramWord is a struct that is defined in the header and from what I have read in the online documentation, the filename has to be of type const char *, so that is what I have done. Converted str_file to be a const char *.

Now, I have tried a few different things which is why some of the code is commented out. When it gets to the line if (myfile.is_open()), it always evaluates to false. Anyone seem to know why?

Thanks, Brandon

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2  
The file does exist right? –  quasiverse Sep 17 '11 at 9:07
    
Yeah it does exist and is in the same directory as the main function, so I should be able to just call it as "test.txt", correct? –  Brandon Sep 17 '11 at 9:11
    
I also just tried it with myfile.open(filename); uncommented and it still doesn't want to work :/ –  Brandon Sep 17 '11 at 9:14
    
Please print out filename and copy this to your address bar or exploer or whatever tool you are using and verify the file's existence. –  FailedDev Sep 17 '11 at 9:19
    
Just before reading your comment FailedDev, I found a website that explains if you don't put in the complete file path it will look in the same directiory as the Object File which is actually in the TEMP folder on Windows. It's not entering the if statement, so the file is open. However the line that is not working is while (myfile.good()) {, it's not entering that loop. Is there any other way to read the contents of the file without this while loop? It doesn't seem very full proof. –  Brandon Sep 17 '11 at 9:21

2 Answers 2

OK IO 101

If you don't give the complete filepath but only the filename then the current working directory will be appended to the filename.

So if your .exe is in C:\temp and you call your program from this directory and your filename is test.txt then the complete filename in this case will be C:\temp\test.txt

This will only work if the .exe and the test.txt are both under C:\temp.

In all other cases it will fail. You could create the absolute path by using win API or the linux equivalent - I don't know what platform you are on.

Now in order to read a succsfully opened file this will suffice :

void CreateHistogram(string str_file, vector<HistogramWord> &result) {
string line;
long location;
HistogramWord newWord;

ifstream myfile (str_file.c_str());
if (myfile.is_open()) {
    while (getline(myfile, line)) {
        line = clarifyWord(line);
}
else{
   //throw exception, print error message etc
   throw std::exception(std::string("Couldn't open file : " + str_file).c_str());
}
}

edit : Thanks @ Shahbaz

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1  
Actually, it needs to be in the directory from which you call the .exe file. So if you are in directory C:\ and you call temp\test.exe, it expects it to be in C:\ not C:\temp –  Shahbaz Sep 17 '11 at 11:27

My best guess is that Windows is "hiding extensions for known file types" so the name of the file is actually different than what you have put in windows. For example if it's a .txt file, and you name it test.txt, the actual name would be test.txt.txt which is quite a stupid thing windows does.

To change this, go to My Computer -> Toold -> Folder Options -> And uncheck the box that says "Hide extensions for Known File Types". This is for XP. If you have another windows it should be more or less the same path. If you don't see the toolbar, try ALT+t (tools) or ALT+f (file) to make it appear.

This problem give quite many of us a trouble in the first semester of college.

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