Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand that a Rails observer should not have direct access to the controller. That makes sense, there is no telling what context the observer is going to be called from. However I have a case that I think merits indirect communication between the two and I'm wondering how to achieve it.

logging and writing analytics events

I would like to use an observer to trigger certain events in Google Analytics. The way this currently works is that the application controller has a method that logs the event and then the application.html.erb template prints the relevant javascript into the page:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base

  def logGAEvent category, action, opt_hash={}
    event = { :category => category,
              :action => action,
              :label => opt_hash[:label],
              :value => opt_hash[:value]}
    (session[:ga_events] ||= []) << event
  end

end

Application.html.erb

<html>
  <head>
    ...

    <script type="text/javascript">
      <%= print_ga_events_js %>
    </script>

  </head>
  ...
</html>

Example event:

class UsersController < ApplicationController
  ...

  def create
     ...
     if @new_user
       logGAEvent('user', 'signup')
     end
  end
end

Why I would like to communicate between an observer and the controller

At the moment the logGAEvent method is called in controllers after certain noteworthy events (someone signs up, creates a new profile etc).

It would be a far nicer pattern to abstract the majority of these events into an observer. This would tidy up the controller and would also make the tracking less ad-hoc. However, once they go into the observer, there still needs to be a way for the template to access the observer's data and print it out.

What I would like to be able to do

Since the observer shouldn't really know about the controller, what I would like to do is record these events into a one-time buffer so that they are flushed at the end of each call but they are also accessible to the controller to write into the document:

class UserObserver < ActiveRecord::Observer
  after_create user
    # I have no idea what would constitue request.buffer but this is
    # the pattern I'm looking for
    request.buffer.ga_events << createGAEvent('user', 'create')
  end
end
end

application.html.erb (using buffer)

Application.html.erb

<html>
  <head>
    ...
    <script type="text/javascript">
    <%= print_ga_events_js(request.buffer.ga_events) %>
    </script>

  </head>
  ...
</html>

Is this in some way possible? It doesn't seem like an unreasonable design pattern to me and it would make the app much cleaner.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I had a similar issue with adding mixpanel events to an application. The way I solved it was I used Controller filters instead of observers. You get very similar sorts of behavior to an observer but with a filter you actually have access to the request and response objects.

Here's an example filter, loosely adapted from mine but with enough changes I wouldn't call it tested code:

module GoogleAnalytics
  class TrackCreation   
    def self.for(*args)
        self.new(*args)
    end

    # pass in the models we want to track creation of
    def initialize(*args)
        @models = args.map do |name|
            name.to_s.tableize.singularize
        end
    end

    # This is called after the create action has happened at the controller level
    def filter(controller)
        #
        controller.params.select{ |model, model_params| filter_for.include? model }.each do |model, model_params|
            #you may want to perform some sort of validation that the creation was successful - say check the response code
            track_event(model, "create", model_params)
        end
  end

    def track_event(category, action, *args)
        flash[:ga] ||= []
        flash[:ga] << ["_trackEvent", type, args]
    end

    def filter_for
        @models
    end
  end
end

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
after_filter GoogleAnalytics::TrackCreation.for(:foo, :bar), :only => :create
end

Within the filter I just set up a custom flash: flash[:mixpanel] ||= []. Flash is nice because it will automagically clear contents between requests. There are a couple gotchas I ran into:

  1. Be aware of the difference between flash and flash.now. Flash is great when you are tracking a resource being created, destroyed, or any other situation where a redirect will happen. But if you actually want to track an event in the immediate response you'll want to use flash.now.
  2. An after_filter has access to the response, but you don't get to change that response. So if you want to spit out tracking events for the current request you need to do it before the response is built.

To actually output the analytics code itself just update your flash partial to take each element in flash[:ga] and write it out.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting approach - I'll take a look at this Yosem - ty –  Peter Nixey Dec 14 '12 at 16:27
    
The only thing I'm not keen about in this approach is the decoupling between the object creation/ destruction and the logging. If the object creation failed it would still be logged in this method right? Also if you created multiple objects it wouldn't be clear which ones to log. I'm thinking that it might be worthwhile creating an object (created_objects / destroyed_object / update_objects) which then gets passed into the after filter. What are your thoughts? –  Peter Nixey Dec 14 '12 at 16:32
    
In order to handle the failure of object creation/deletion you can check the response http codes. There are always a few edge cases that can be tough to track down if you only look at errors so I generally just track an event if I get a 302 for creation or deletion. If you want to handle multiple objects being created you could either check the params and loop through each, or you could do some magic with an around filter and tracking all objects created between response start and response end. My only concern with an around filter is that you might run into concurrency issues. –  Yosem Sweet Dec 16 '12 at 6:44

Isn't this a bit against the model-view-controller principle? The observer belongs to the model, so it can't have access to the session/request/etc. However, you could create an instance variable in the model that stores the GA events with all the business logic neatly encapsulated in an observer, and then retrieve that in a controller...

e.g.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  attr_accessor :ga_events
  @ga_events=[]

  #rest of User class
end

class UserObserver < ActiveRecord::Observer
  def after_create(user)
    user.ga_events << createGAEvent('user', 'create')
  end
end

class UsersController < ApplicationController
  ...
  def create
     ...
     if @new_user
       @ga_events=@user.ga_events
     end
  end
end

<html>
  <head>
    ...
    <script type="text/javascript">
    <%= print_ga_events_js(@ga_events) %>
    </script>

  </head>
  ...
</html>

Whatchya reckon? :)

share|improve this answer
    
Hello old chap, fancy seeing you here. You're right about the MVC principle and what I'm really getting to is some sort of in-memory message queue that flushes at the end of the request. I don't mind what holds it. You've suggested using the @user model to hold it however the problem is that the observer and the controller will each see different instances (although in theory Rails 3.1 object map could put paid to this). I suppose one could use a class variable which would be the same everywhere but I'd need to learn how those work :P –  Peter Nixey Sep 21 '11 at 15:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.