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I don't like using a lot of IF statements. Here is what I am playing around with right now, in the world of having to use a lot of IF statements to get it done:

First, some variables...

pick_level = 1
lockpicking_level1_maxxp = 40
lockpicking_level2_maxxp = 70
lockpicking_level3_maxxp = 100

Now we get to picking a lock. A successful pick happens when a random number between 1 and anything up to the current lockpicking skill level's max xp divided by 2 is chosen. So for level 1 it's anything between 1 and 20 - level 2, anything between 1 and 35, and level 3 anything between 1 and 50. Here's how it would look with IF statements:

x = random.randint(1, 100)
if pick_level == 1:
  if x not in range(1, (lockpicking_level1_maxxp / 2)):
    print 'You failed to pick the lock'
    ...
elif pick_level == 2:
  if x not in range(1, (lockpicking_level2_maxxp / 2)):
    etcetc

What I'd like to do is determine the xp based on the value of pick_level and not have to do a bunch of IF statements asking the same question over and over. It would go down as something like this (using grave accents like in bash):

if x not in range(1, (lockpicking_level`pick_level`_maxxp / 2)):

This way I can avoid all the IF statements by having the code automatically become 'lockpicking_level1_maxxp', 'lockpicking_level2_maxxp' or 'lockpicking_level3_maxxp' based on whatever pick_level's value is.

It has been a while since I've done bash scripts though, so my memory of how it works may be off a bit. Also I know `` in Python up to version 3 is basically the same as using repr() so that wouldn't be how to do it. Is there any way I can do this or am I stuck writing ugly IF statements all over the place?

I suppose I could use a dict, as such:

lockpicking_maxxp = {1:20, 2:35, 3:50}
...
if x in range(1, lockpicking_maxxp[pick_level]):

...but I don't know if that is exactly how I will be setting up my skill database (although it will probably end up being a JSON file. I love JSON.)

Thank you very much for your time. I look forward to learning more about this idea.

share|improve this question
3  
Use a dictionary. Anything that amounts to using eval is ugly, proner to giving useless errors, harder to comprehend, and worst of all completely unnecessary. –  delnan Sep 17 '11 at 11:59
1  
Try reading up on Object-oriented programming. In the long-run it will make it much easier to cope with more complex stuff. Shell/Bash scripts only have primitive data structures, python is better equipped, dict's and sets make life a lot better. eval() and friends are OK in shellscripts, but in a clean high level language it is considered bad style. But dont let this stop you, programming is awesome fun no matter how you do it! :D –  sleeplessnerd Sep 17 '11 at 13:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use locals() to get the local symbol table as a dict and use it to get the variable value. i.e.:

>>> pick_level = 1
>>> lockpicking_level1_maxxp = 40
>>> lockpicking_level2_maxxp = 70
>>> lockpicking_level3_maxxp = 100
>>> locals()["lockpicking_level%d_maxxp" % pick_level]
40
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: There are so many better ways to solve the OP's problem. –  Ned Batchelder Sep 17 '11 at 12:57
    
Agreed. I wouldn't personally design my code this way but this was what he was asking, isn't it? –  Avaris Sep 17 '11 at 13:15
    
Indeed, as far as my question of "is it possible to dynamically insert a value into a variable's name", this seems to be the way to do it. As has been mentioned, I will be much better off using a dict, especially since I will be having more than only this skill. But great job finding an answer to this, it's been something that has been sitting in the back of my mind for a while and today a use for it came up so I thought I'd try to figure it out once and for all :D –  Drew Beardall Sep 17 '11 at 13:21

Don't repeat yourself. Use data structures instead of individual objects as much as possible:

lockpicking_maxxp = {
    1: 40,
    2: 70,
    3: 100
}

x = random.randint(1, 100)
if x > lockpicking_maxxp[pick_level] / 2:
    print 'You failed to pick the lock'
    ...

Of course, you probably have other skills in this game, so you might want something more like:

maxxp = {
    'lockpicking': {
        1: 40,
        2: 70,
        3: 100
    }, 'trap_searching': {
        1: 50,
        ...
    }, ...
}

skill = 'lockpicking'
x = random.randint(1, 100)
if x > maxxp[skill][level[skill]] / 2:
    print 'You failed to pick the lock'
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. When it comes down to it, when I move beyond hacking away at individual prototypes, there will be the need for an actual data structure to hold everything. I figure I'll make a defaultdict called skills, then I can do like you suggested, calling it like if x not in range(1, skills['lockpicking'][pick_level]): Technically I'd like to declare this the answer, because it's a proper coding technique for this situation, but I think officially I should mark Avaris' answer as 'accepted' because they replied with a way to dynamically insert a value into a variable's name :P –  Drew Beardall Sep 17 '11 at 13:27

Whenever you feel the need to add numbers to your variables you should probably just use a list:

pick_level = 1
lockpicking_levels = [0,40, 70, 100]

test = random.randint(1, 100)

if test < lockpicking_levels[pick_level] / 2:
    print "you failed"
else:
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply! Indeed it seems I will be better off using a data structure to hold values so I can reference just that one thing. Not only does it cut down on the IF statements, but it cuts down on variable clutter as well! –  Drew Beardall Sep 17 '11 at 13:34

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